GenuineScooters

Scooter and Motorcycle Laws by State

Before buying a scooter or motorcycle, it’s important that you understand your state’s licensing laws so you’re able to ride your new bike on the streets! Please click on your STATE below to find the rules and regulations in your area.

CLICK ON YOUR STATE TO VIEW LAWS

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Alabama

50cc and Under Law
Alabama sorts motorized vehicles like scooters, mopeds, and motorized bicycles into a single category: motor-driven cycles.

Even though these vehicles essentially are a step down from traditional motorcycles in terms of weight and power—and even though you can operate them at a younger age—you still must apply for a “B” restricted motorcycle license with the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency (ALEA).
Links: www.dmv.org/al-alabama/other-types.php

50cc and over Law
Alabama sorts motorized vehicles like scooters, mopeds, and motorized bicycles into a single category: motor-driven cycles.

Even though these vehicles essentially are a step down from traditional motorcycles in terms of weight and power—and even though you can operate them at a younger age—you still must apply for a “B” restricted motorcycle license with the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency (ALEA).
Links: www.dmv.org/al-alabama/other-types.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
If you want to operate a motor-driven cycle, you’ll need to apply for a motorcycle license with a “B” restriction. The “B” restriction means you aren’t old enough or properly licensed to operate a motorcycle, but you can operate motor-driven cycles like mopeds, scooters, and motorized bikes.

You must be at least 14 years old to apply for a “B” restricted motorcycle license. (If you’re 16 years old or older, you can apply for a full motorcycle license and legally operate motorcycles as well as motor-driven cycles.)
Links: www.dmv.org/al-alabama/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
Motorcycle Insurance Minimum Requirements in Alabama

Although state residents don't have to show proof of motorcycle insurance when they register their bikes, state law does require them to have some kind of coverage to legally operate their motorcycles in the state.
Links: www.dmv.org/al-alabama/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Alabama law requires anyone who operates or rides on a motorcycle to wear protective headgear specifically designed for motorcycle riders and passengers. The law requires the helmet to have a hard exterior shell of nonshatterable material that resists impact and penetration. The helmet must also have a firmly secured shock absorbent cradle for the head that is designed to support the helmet and maintain separation between the head and outer shell. The padding of the helmet must be impact-resistant, absorbent, and of substantial thickness in all areas where the head is in close proximity with or may contact the outer shell. The helmet must be made of durable materials that will not undergo appreciable alteration as the helmet ages. Materials known to cause skin irritation or disease are not to be used.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#alabama

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Alaska

50cc and Under Law
The Alaska Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) provides multiple classes of motorcycle licenses and endorsements depending on the type of motor-driven cycle you want to operate.

Motorcycle Permits & Licenses
Alaska’s Class M1 motorcycle license (or endorsement, if you already have a valid driver’s license) because it’s the license that allows you to operate any:
- Motorcycle with an engine displacement of more than 50 cc.
- Motor scooter, motorized bike, or other type of motor-driven cycle with an engine displacement of fewer than 50 cc.
Links: www.dmv.org/ak-alaska/other-types.php

50cc and over Law
The Alaska Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) provides multiple classes of motorcycle licenses and endorsements depending on the type of motor-driven cycle you want to operate.

Motorcycle Permits & Licenses
Alaska’s Class M1 motorcycle license (or endorsement, if you already have a valid driver’s license) because it’s the license that allows you to operate any:
- Motorcycle with an engine displacement of more than 50 cc.
- Motor scooter, motorized bike, or other type of motor-driven cycle with an engine displacement of fewer than 50 cc.
Links: www.dmv.org/ak-alaska/other-types.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Registering Your Motor-Driven Cycle
In addition to the above requirements, you must also register your moped or scooter. And in order to register your vehicle, you must:
- Have an M2 motorcycle permit
- Have your MCO (Manufacturer’s Certificate of Origin) if your vehicle is new.
- Pay another fee of $60 to register your vehicle, and another $15 fee for titling.

In total for the permit, registration and title, it will cost you $95. You must register in person at your local DMV office.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-alaska/

Insurance Laws
Alaska Motorcycle Insurance Requirements
In order to comply with Alaska’s motorcycle insurance laws, your bike must be covered with liability insurance to help you pay for property damage and bodily injury suffered by others in a crash that you cause.

Your motorcycle insurance policy must include the following minimum liability limits per accident:
- $50,000 for bodily injury or death to one person.
- $100,000 for total bodily injury or death if multiple people are hurt in the accident.
- $25,000 for property damage.

Other Two-Wheeled Vehicles
Not all two-wheeled vehicles need to be insured, but you may find value in purchasing insurance for these vehicles.

Motorcycle insurance can generally be purchased for:
- Scooters.
- Mopeds.
- ATVs.

If you are interested in insurance for one of the above, speak with your motorcycle insurance provider about the right coverage for these types of vehicles.
Links: www.dmv.org/ak-alaska/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Persons 18 years of age or older "may not" be required to wear a helmet when operating a motorcycle in Alaska as long as that person is licensed to operate a motorcycle.

However, motorcycle operators are required to wear eye protection unless the motorcycle is equipped with a windscreen or windshield.

The law was established and is regulated by Alaska's Public Safety Commissioner. Because these standards and specifications are subject to change, it's best to check with the Commissioner before riding as a driver or passenger on a motorcycle in Alaska.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#alaska

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Arizona

50cc and Under Law
Motor-driven Cycle – A motorcycle originally manufactured to exceed 20 mph, rated at 5 hp or less, and not more than three wheels in contact with the ground. Includes motor scooters rated at 5 hp or less.

A motor-driven cycle must be both titled and registered. Emissions testing is not required. Vehicle liability insurance is required.
Links: www.moped2.org/laws/Arizona.htm

50cc and over Law
Types of Two-Wheeled Vehicles
In the state of Arizona the following two-wheeled vehicles are defined as motorcycles, or two-wheeled vehicles:

A motorized vehicle which has no more than three wheels and has a seat for the driver is considered as motorcycle. Tractors and mopeds are excluded. A bicycle-like vehicle with pedals and a small engine with less than 50 cc displacement is considered as moped. Its maximum speed is 25 mph and 1.5 brake horsepower (or less).

A motorized vehicle with no more than three wheels designed to go faster than 20 mph but with an engine displacement from 49 to 80 cc is considered as motor-driven cycle. (motor scooters are included).
Links: www.moped2.org/laws/Arizona.htm

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
A motorcycle license or endorsement is needed to operate any motor-driven cycle. A moped must be registered, but a vehicle title is not issued.
Links: www.moped2.org/laws/Arizona.htm

Insurance Laws
Vehicle liability insurance is required.
Links: www.moped2.org/laws/Arizona.htm

Helmet Laws
You must wear a motorcycle helmet in Arizona if you're
EITHER:
A motorcycle rider OR A passenger who is under 18 years old.
Links: www.dmv.org/motorcycles/motorcycle-helmet-laws.php

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Arkansas

50cc and Under Law
Like most states, the main determining factor in Arkansas for distinguishing between a motorized bicycle or motorcycle is engine size.

Although there are federal laws for e-bikes, in order for a vehicle to be considered a motorized bicycle in Arkansas it must have an engine that is 50 CC or smaller.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-arkansas/

50cc and over Law
In Arkansas, you must hold a Class M or MD license to operate motor-driven cycles, which include:
- Scooters.
- Mopeds.
- Small motorcycles with engine displacements of fewer than 250 cc.
Links: www.dmv.org/ar-arkansas/other-types.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Motor-Driven Cycles in Arkansas

In Arkansas, you must hold a Class M or MD license to operate motor-driven cycles, which include:
- Scooters.
- Mopeds.
- Small motorcycles with engine displacements of fewer than 250 cc.

Class MD License
The Class MD License is a restricted license for drivers between the ages of 14 years old and 16 years old.

Applying for a Class MD License is similar to applying for a Class M license (a regular motorcycle license), and we outline the process – including the required documents, fees, and testing –over at Motorcycle Licenses in Arkansas. Your Class MD license is valid for 1 year from the date you pass the knowledge exam and can’t be extended over 1 year.

ADDITIONALLY, you’ll need to register your motor-driven cycle
Links: www.dmv.org/ar-arkansas/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
Arkansas Motorcycle Insurance Requirements
In order to title, register, and legally operate your motorcycle, you must purchase a motorcycle insurance policy that meets the same liability coverage requirements you’d have to meet if you were insuring a regular four-wheeled, private passenger vehicle. Those requirements are:
- $25,000 per person for bodily injury
- $50,000 per accident for 2 or more people
- $25,000 to cover property damage
Links: www.dmv.org/ar-arkansas/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Arkansas law requires motorcycle operators and passengers under 21 to wear a helmet. The helmet requirement does not apply to three-wheel motorcycles equipped with a cab and a windshield which do not exceed twenty horsepower (20 hp) when such motorcycles are used by municipal police departments.

All operators and riders, however, regardless of age, must wear protective glasses, goggles or transparent face shields.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#arkansas

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California

50cc and Under Law
A motor-driven cycle is similar to a motorcycle, but it has an engine that is 149 cubic centimeters or less in size, so it can’t be driven in a freeway. Motor-driven cycles must be registered with the DMV, and you need to have an M1 motorcycle license in order to operate one.
Links: www.valuepenguin.com/california-moped-scooter-insurance-laws

50cc and over Law
Motorcycle is defined as a vehicle with two or three wheels and an engine which is greater than 150 cubic centimeters in size.
Links: www.valuepenguin.com/california-moped-scooter-insurance-laws

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
And while motorized scooters are street-legal vehicles, they do not need to be registered with the DMV or carry license plates.
Links: www.valuepenguin.com/california-moped-scooter-insurance-laws

Insurance Laws
In order to ride a moped in California, you need to carry liability insurance with at least $15,000 of bodily injury coverage per person, $30,000 of bodily injury coverage per accident and $5,000 of property damage coverage per accident.
Links: www.valuepenguin.com/california-moped-scooter-insurance-laws

Helmet Laws
California Vehicle Code Section 27803 requires all motorcycle drivers and passengers to wear a helmet when on a motorcycle, motorized bicycle or motor-driven cycle.
Links: www.victimslawyer.com/motorcycle-helmet-laws-in-california.html

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Colorado

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In order for a vehicle to be considered a moped in Colorado it must have an engine size of 50 CC or less, or 4,476 watts for electrical motors.

The majority of scooters will also fall into this category. Although, if you are not careful your vehicle may cross the line and might actually be considered a motorcycle, which has different requirements.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-colorado/
https://www.colorado.gov/pacific/dmv/low-power-scooter

50cc and over Law
Motorcycles Colorado law defines a motorcycle as a vehicle with two or three wheels and a motor larger then 50cc. A motorcycle must be equipped with the same mandatory equipment as a car or truck; operating headlights, taillights, turn signals and all other equipment required of any motorized vehicle.
Links: denverbicyclelaw.com/what-is-the-difference-under-colorado-law-between-an-e-bike-scooter-and-motorcycle/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Moped Requirements
In order to drive a moped or scooter, you must have a valid drivers license. You must also need to register your motor-assisted cycle.

Luckily, registration procedure is relatively simple. All you will need is the following:
- A completed and signed Low-Powered Scooter Registration Application (form DR 2701).
- A proof of ownership, such as a bill of sale, affidavit of ownership, or MSO (Manufacturer’s Statement of Origin).
- Some proof of insurance.
- A one-time payment of $5.85.

You will need to either mail in all of the required materials, or take them to an authorized moped dealer in your area.

To register by mail, send all of the required materials to the following address:
- Colorado Department of Revenue
- Motor Vehicle Registration
- Denver, CO 80261

You must carry a proof of insurance at all times when riding a motor-assisted cycle in Colorado.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-colorado/

Insurance Laws
Colorado Motorcycle Insurance Requirements
You must carry the following amounts of liability insurance:
- $25,000—per person for bodily injury
- $50,000—per accident for bodily injury
- $15,000—per accident for property damage
Links: www.dmv.org/co-colorado/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Colorado does not require adult motorcycle drivers or passengers to wear helmets. All operators and passengers under 18 years of age must wear helmets that meet or exceed the standards established by the United States Department of Transportation (DOT) for motorcycle helmets; the helmets must be designed to reduce injury from head impact, as well as consist of lining, padding, and a chin strap. The chip strap must be worn any time the motorcycle is in motion.

Adult operators and riders are required to wear goggles or eyeglasses with lenses made of safety glass or plastic. These eye protection devices are not required if the operator/passenger is wearing a helmet with eye protection made of safety glass or plastic.

The Colorado Department of Revenue is responsible for adopting standards and specifications for the design of the goggles and eyeglasses.

Because these standards and specifications are subject to change, it's advisable to check with the Department before taking to Colorado roadways on a motorcycle.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#colorado

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Connecticut

50cc and Under Law
Motor-Driven Cycles
In Connecticut, a motor-driven cycle must:
- Have a motor that is no bigger than 50 cc.
- Have a seat that that is at least 26 inches high.

In order to be considered a motor-drive cycle rather than a motorcycle, your vehicle must beet the requirements above.

You must always wear a helmet if you are under 18 years old, and you cannot ride on sidewalks, turnpikes or limited access highways.

Additionally, due to your lack of speed you must always drive in the right lane or on the shoulder on the right side of the road, except when you are making a left turn.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-connecticut/\

50cc and over Law
CT Scooters, Mopeds, & Motorbikes
Connecticut defines motor-driven cycles as any moped, motor scooter, or motorbike with an engine displacement of fewer than 50 cc and a seat height measuring 26 inches or more.

Both teen and adult driversneed a basic driver’s license (Class D) to operate motor-driven cycles.

The CT DMV doesn’t require registration for motor scooters, mopeds, or motorbikes.

When it comes to motor-driven cycle rules of the road, you:
- CANNOT operate them on sidewalks, limited access highways, or turnpikes.
- MUST drive in the right lane or a useable shoulder on the right side IF the maximum speed of your motor-driven cycle is less than the speed limit, UNLESS you’re making a left turn.
Links: www.dmv.org/ct-connecticut/other-types.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Motor-Driven Cycle Licensing and Registration

You must be at least 16 years old, and have a valid Connecticut driver’s license in order to ride a motor-assisted cycle.

If it is your first time getting a drivers license in Connecticut you must take an 8-hour Safe Driving Practice class. And if you are under 18, you must also have at least 2 hours of training with a parent or legal guardian.

You are not required to register your moped or scooter, and you are not required to carry any insurance. However, you should be sure that your vehicle is classified as a motor-driven cycle, as the requirements for motorcycles are different.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-connecticut/

Insurance Laws
Motorcycle Insurance in Connecticut
In order to register your motorcycle in Connecticut, you must have adequate motorcycle insurance coverage on your bike.

Although motorcycle insurance requirements in the state mirror the requirements of car insurance in Connecticut, slight differences do apply. Connecticut Motorcycle Insurance Requirements.

When you register your motorcycle, you must provide proof that you have adequate motorcycle liability insurance to help cover costs related to property damage or bodily injury that you cause to others in a crash.

Your motorcycle insurance policy must include the following minimum limits per accidents:
- $25,000 for bodily injury per person.
- $50,000 for total bodily injury if multiple people are hurt in the accident.
- $25,000 for property damage.
Links: www.dmv.org/ct-connecticut/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
In Connecticut, no one under 18 is permitted to operate or ride on a motorcycle without wearing a helmet.

There is a $90 fine for being cited without a helmet.

The Commissioner of Motor Vehicles is responsible for adopting helmet regulations.

Because these regulations can change, motorcycle riders and passengers should check with the Commissioner before riding motorcycles on Connecticut roadways.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#connecticut

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Delaware

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
Delaware defines a moped as a non-pedal bicycle with 2 wheels, that has an engine size of less than 55 cc, that produces no more than 2.7 brake hp, and cannot go more than 25 mph on level ground. The laws are a little more lenient than some of the other states.

If you have a moped that meets the above requirements, then you do not have to worry about getting it titled and registered! However, you do have to pay a registration fee of $5 every three years, and they need to have a horn that can bee heard from at least 100 feet away.

You need to have a valid Delaware driver’s license to ride a moped.

Mopeds are not allowed on interstate or limited-access highways.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-delaware/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Delaware moped registration Mopeds and tripeds are required to be titled and registered before they can be operated on Delaware highways. Refer to the General Titling Requirements for titling information. The fee for registration is $5.00 for three years. Mopeds shall be exempt from Delaware's safety inspection.
Links: www.dmv.de.gov/services/vehicle_services/reg/ve_reg_moped.shtml

Insurance Laws
State law requires you to have motorcycle liability insurance for your bike. Liability insurance will help pay for costs related to property damage and injuries suffered by others resulting from an accident you cause.

In order to be compliant with Delaware law, your motorcycle insurance policy must include the following minimum coverage limits per accident:
- $25,000 for bodily injury per person.
- $25,000 for total bodily injury if multiple people are hurt in the accident.
- $10,000 for property damage.
Links: www.dmv.org/de-delaware/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Every person up to the age of 19 must wear a safety helmet and eye protection approved by the secretary.

Any rider over the age of 19 must have a helmet and eye protection in their possession when riding.

Because regulations are subject to change, it's best to check with the Secretary of Safety before riding on a motorcycle in Delaware.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#delaware

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District of Columbia

50cc and Under Law
The District of Columbia defines motorized bicycles as a bike that:
- Has 2 or 3 wheels that are at least 16 inches in diameter.
- Has a maximum speed of 35 MPH on level ground.
- Has an engine that is no bigger than 1.5 brake horsepower.

If your bike exceeds the above requirements then it is considered to be a motorcycle, and you must follow all of the motorcycle laws.

It’s also important to note that the district prohibits motorized bicycles from being driven anywhere that a regular car would be prohibited. This means that you can’t drive them on sidewalks, off-street bike paths and bicycle routs, even if you aren’t engaging the motor and are just propelling yourself with human power.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-district-of-columbia/

50cc and over Law
The District of Columbia defines motorized bicycles as a bike that:
- Has 2 or 3 wheels that are at least 16 inches in diameter.
- Has a maximum speed of 35 MPH on level ground.
- Has an engine that is no bigger than 1.5 brake horsepower.

If your bike exceeds the above requirements then it is considered to be a motorcycle, and you must follow all of the motorcycle laws.

It’s also important to note that the district prohibits motorized bicycles from being driven anywhere that a regular car would be prohibited. This means that you can’t drive them on sidewalks, off-street bike paths and bicycle routs, even if you aren’t engaging the motor and are just propelling yourself with human power.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-district-of-columbia/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
The Washington, D.C., Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) classifies both scooters and mopeds as motorcycles for registration and titling purposes. To register, follow normal registration and titling procedures for motorcycles, and pay the applicable fees.
Links: www.dmv.org/washington-dc/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
Motorcycle Insurance Minimum Requirements in Washington DC
All motor vehicles registered in Washington DC—including motorcycles, scooters, and mopeds—must be insured to cover the costs of any damages or injuries they cause. This is called “financial responsibility.”
Links: www.dmv.org/washington-dc/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
D.C. law requires all motorcycle operators and passengers to wear helmets of a type approved by the Director of the Department of Motor Vehicles. At a minimum, the helmet must meet The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Specifications for Protective Headgear for Vehicle Users, Standard Z90-.1-1966.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#district-columbia

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Florida

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
Excluding motorcycles and e-bikes, there are two other categories for motor-driven cycles in Florida – mopeds and motorized scooters. It’s important to pay close attention to which category your vehicle falls into, since there are different laws and requirements for each. Along those same lines, if your motor-driven cycle is too powerful to fit into either of the following classifications, then it is likely classified as a motorcycle, which also has it’s own laws and requirements, including different licensing and registration laws.

In Florida, in order for a vehicle to be considered a moped it must:
- Have a seat
- Have pedals for assisting in propulsion
- Have 3 or less wheels
- Have a motor with 2 brake hp or less, and 50 cc or less displacement size
- Be unable to go more than 30 mph on level ground
- Have an automatic transmission
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-florida/

50cc and over Law
A vehicle with two or three wheels, a seat or saddle, and an engine of 51cc or more is generally considered a motorcycle. To operate a motorcycle on the road, you need both a driver’s license as well as a motorcycle endorsement, and Florida law requires you to wear eye protection. In addition, the motorcycle needs both a title and registration. You can operate a motorcycle without a helmet in Florida, but you need to carry at least $10,000 of PIP motorcycle insurance.
Links: https://www.valuepenguin.com/florida-moped-scooter-insurance-laws

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Two-Wheeled Vehicles Defined
If you're unsure about the registration and insurance requirements for your two-wheeled vehicle, please call the DHSMV at (850) 617-2000 for clarification.

Motorcycle—Motorcycles are generally the easiest of the two-wheeled vehicles to spot. Know that if your vehicle has an engine displacement of more than 50 cc, Florida considers it a motorcycle and you must register it.
Mopeds—Your vehicle is a moped if it has:
- 3 wheels or fewer
- A seat
- Pedals that allow you to propel the vehicle
- A motor of two-brake horsepower or less
- The ability to go no faster than 30 MPH
- An automatic power-drive system
- A displacement of 50 cc or less (if it has an internal combustion engine)

Scooters—Your vehicle is a scooter if it has:
- No seat or saddle
- 3 wheels or less
- The ability to go no faster than 30 MPH
Links: www.dmv.org/fl-florida/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Insurance Laws
Two-Wheeled Vehicles Defined
If you're unsure about the registration and insurance requirements for your two-wheeled vehicle, please call the DHSMV at (850) 617-2000 for clarification.

Motorcycle—Motorcycles are generally the easiest of the two-wheeled vehicles to spot. Know that if your vehicle has an engine displacement of more than 50 cc, Florida considers it a motorcycle and you must register it.

Mopeds—Your vehicle is a moped if it has:
- 3 wheels or fewer
- A seat
- Pedals that allow you to propel the vehicle
- A motor of two-brake horsepower or less
- The ability to go no faster than 30 MPH
- An automatic power-drive system
- A displacement of 50 cc or less (if it has an internal combustion engine)

Scooters—Your vehicle is a scooter if it has:
- No seat or saddle
- 3 wheels or less
- The ability to go no faster than 30 MPH
Links: www.dmv.org/fl-florida/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Florida's helmet law is somewhat complex. Generally, it requires all motorcycle operators and riders to wear helmets. The helmet law, however, does not apply to operators or riders over 21, so long as the person is covered by an insurance policy providing for at least $10,000 in medical benefits for injuries incurred as a result of a crash while operating or riding on a motorcycle.

The helmet law also does not apply to any person 16 or older who operates or rides on a motorcycle powered by a motor with a displacement of 50 cubic centimeters or less or is rated not in excess of 2 brake horsepower and which is not capable of propelling the motorcycle at a speed greater than 30 miles per hour on level ground.

All motorcycle drivers and riders, regardless of age, are required to wear eye protection. Anyone who rides in an enclosed side car is not subject to Florida's helmet or eye protection laws.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#florida

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Georgia

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In Georgia, a moped is defined as a bike that:
- Has motor that is no bigger than 50 cc.
- Can not go faster than 30 mph on level ground.
- Has an automatic transmission

If your motor-driven bike does not meet the above requirements, then it is most likely classified as a motorcycle, which has different regulations and requirements.

You need to be at least 15 years old in order to drive a moped, and have a valid Georgia drivers license. You can only drive your moped on a public road that has a speed limit of 35 mph or less, and you must always wear a helmet.

Unlike motorcycles and motorized scooters, mopeds do not need to be titled or registered.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-georgia/

50cc and over Law
A Class M license is required to operate, legally, a motorcycle or motor-driven cycle in Georgia. Every motor vehicle having a saddle for the use of the rider and designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground, but excluding a tractor and moped (with engine size less than 50CC), are defined as motorcycles. Georgia law places all types of motorcycles including scooters, motorbikes and minibikes (with engine size 51 CC or greater) into one classification. All are considered motor-driven cycles.
Links: dds.georgia.gov/motorcycle-license

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
If you've just purchased a new or used motorcycle, you'll need to register it to avoid any traffic citations. The process varies by whether you got your new bike from:

A Georgia dealership. OR a private seller.
Links: www.dmv.org/ga-georgia/motorcycle-registration.php

Insurance Laws
In Georgia, a motorcycle owner or rider must establish insurance in order to own or operate a motorcycle. Your motorcycle insurance is critical in the event of a motorcycle crash in Atlanta and may be your best source of securing your financial security in the event of a serious crash-related injury. This is an important-and legally necessary-investment and should not be overlooked.

Your most viable option for establishing motorcycle insurance in Georgia will likely be to buy traditional liability insurance through any auto insurance company that is approved to provide such insurance in Georgia.

What Motorcycle Insurance in Georgia Must Cover

Valid motorcycle insurance in Georgia will meet the following requirements:
- at least $25,000 for bodily injury or death of one person when a motorcycle crash occurs;
- a minimum of $50,000 for bodily injury or death of at least two people in an accident; and
- coverage for damages of at least $25,000 to one's property as a result of an accident.
Links: www.sburkelaw.com/faqs/what-are-georgias-motorcycle-insurance-requirements.cfm

Helmet Laws
Under Georgia law, all motorcycle operators and riders must wear a helmet. In addition, eye protection is required if the motorcycle is not equipped with a windshield.

The Commissioner of Motor Vehicle Safety establishes the helmet and eye protection standards. Because these standards can change, you should check with the Commissioner before riding a motorcycle in Georgia.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#georgia

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Hawaii

50cc and Under Law
Motorized Scooters
Motorized scooters are treated similar to motorcycles. In fact, the laws and regulations are essential the same for both motorcycles and scooters; you must have a valid motorcycle license and carry the minimum required insurance.
Links: https://www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-hawaii/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Mopeds are required to be registered with the County director of finance (249-14 (a), HRS). The registration decal must be affixed to the rear fender facing rearward (249-14 (b), HRS). To register a moped, it must have a certification label affixed by the manufacturer stating that it complies with all applicable federal motor vehicle safety standards (FMVSS). This is a federal requirement for all motor vehicles that are intended for use on the public roads.
Links: Information-for-MOPED-Owners-and-Drivers.doc

Insurance Laws
Hawaii requires you to have liability insurance on your motorcycle to help you pay for any property damages or bodily injuries suffered by others in an accident you cause.

Your motorcycle insurance policy must include the following minimum coverage limits per accident:
- $20,000 for bodily injury per person.
- $40,000 for total bodily injury if multiple people are hurt in the accident.
- $10,000 for property damage.
Links: www.dmv.org/hi-hawaii/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
In Hawaii, no one under age 18 can operate or ride as a passenger on a motorcycle UNLESS that person wears a safety helmet securely fastened with a chin strap. Riders are not required to wear a helmet over 18 years of age, but must wear safety glasses or goggles or face shield in cases where the motorcycle is not equipped with a windshield.

To be sure you're in compliance with Hawaii law, check with the Director before taking to the open road.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#hawaii

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Idaho

50cc and Under Law
In Idaho, mopeds are defined in a couple of different ways.
For one, a moped can be a motor-driven cycle that has:
- Both motorized and pedal propulsion capabilities.
- The ability to travel no faster than 30 mph on level ground.
- 2 wheels or 3 wheels in contact with the ground while operating.
- An engine displacement of no more than 50 cc.
- A power drive system that operates without shifting or clutching once engaged.
Links: www.dmv.org/id-idaho/other-types.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
In Idaho, if your motorized bike falls into the category of a moped and not a motorcycle, then you do not need a motorcycle license – just a valid driver’s license.

In order for a motorbike to be considered a moped, it must:
- Have peddles to assist with propulsion.
- Have a top speed of 30 mph on a flat surface.
- Have no more than 3 wheels (and no less than 2.)
- Have an engine that is no bigger than 50 cc (if gas powered), and no more than 2-brake hp (if electric.)
- Have an automatic transmission.

Fortunately, the ITD (Idaho Transportation Department) also has an easy to follow flowchart to also assist in determining how your motorized bike is categorized.
Links: www.dmv.org/id-idaho/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
To legally operate your motorcycle in Idaho you must provide proof of financial responsibility. Compliance, for most riders, involves purchasing a liability insurance policy.
Links: www.dmv.org/id-idaho/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
According to Idaho Statute 49-666, all motorcycle and all-terrain vehicle (ATV) riders under 18 years old must wear an approved helmet when they're not riding on private property.
Links: www.dmv.org/id-idaho/safety-laws.php

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Illinois

50cc and Under Law
In order for a motorbike to be considered a moped in Illinois, it must:
- Have a top speed of 30 mph on level ground.
- Have an engine that produces no more than 2-brake hp, and is no bigger than 50 cc (if gas powered)
- Have an automatic transmission
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-illinois/

50cc and over Law
Mopeds
In order for a motorbike to be considered a moped in Illinois, it must:
- Have a top speed of 30 mph on level ground.
- Have an engine that produces no more than 2-brake hp, and is no bigger than 50 cc (if gas powered)
- Have an automatic transmission

If your motorized bike meets all of the above criteria, then you can drive it with a standard valid IL driver’s license. On the other hand, if your motorbike exceeds the above criteria, then you will need a Class L driver’s license.

Make sure you know which category you vehicle fits in to, since the different classifications have different laws and requirements. Generally speaking, mopeds are low speed vehicles that are only designed for limited use on public roads. Riders must always carry a valid driver’s license and follow all regular traffic laws.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-illinois/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
In Illinois, mopeds are required to be registered and titled. You can register by mail, or at a local SOS (Secretary of State) office.

You will have to pay an additional sales tax when registering if you bought your moped from a private seller (sales tax varies between counties.)

To register in person at a local SOS office, you will need to bring:
- A completed Vehicle Transaction Application (Form VSD 190.)
- Proof of ownership.
- A check or money order to pay both the registration and titling fees – $41 for registration and $95 for titling (a total of $136, plus tax if applicable.)

Alternatively, you can also register by mail. You will need all of the above materials, including the payment of the fees, and mail them to the following:

Secretary of State
Vehicle Services Department
ERT Section, Rm 424
501 S. 2nd St.
Springfield, IL 62756

Once registered, you will receive new license plates to put on your vehicle. Depending on what your motorized bike is classified as, you will be issued different license plates. Make sure you provide accurate information on your application so that you get the appropriate plates.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-illinois/

Insurance Laws
State law requires you to have liability insurance to help pay for any property damage of bodily injuries you might cause others in an accident for which you are found at fault.

Your insurance policy must include the following minimum coverage limits per accident:
- $25,000 of coverage for injuries to or death of one person in an accident.
- $50,000 of coverage for injuries to or deaths of more than one person in an accident.
- $20,000 of property damage coverage per accident.
Links: www.dmv.org/il-illinois/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Illinois law does not require motorcycle operators or passengers to wear helmets.

The law does, however, require drivers and riders to protect their eyes with glasses, goggles, or a transparent shield. Under Illinois law, "glasses" means ordinary eye pieces worn in front of the eye, such as spectacles or sunglasses made of shatter-resistant material. "Goggles" means a device that protects the eyes without obstructing peripheral vision. The goggles must provide protection from the front and sides, and may or may not form a complete seal with the face.

A "transparent shield" includes a windshield attached to the front of the bike, provided that it extends above the eyes when the driver is seated in a normal, upright riding position. A "transparent shield" also includes a face shield that covers the wearer's eyes and face at least to the point approximately to the tip of the nose. All transparent shields must be shatter-resistant.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#illinois

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Indiana

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In order for a motorbike to be considered a moped in Indiana, it must be unable to go more than 25 mph on a flat surface (this is the only requirement for electric mopeds.) Moreover, if it is a gas-powered bike, then it must also:
- Have an engine that is 50 cc or smaller, and produce less than 2-brake horsepower.
- Have an automatic transmission.

If your motorbike exceeds the above specification, then it is most likely considered a motorcycle, which must be registered and titled, and requires the appropriate license to ride.

Mopeds cannot be driven on sidewalks or footpaths, and cannot be driven on interstate highways.

Scooters
Like motorized bikes, scooters may also fall under either classification, depending on their top speed and other specifications.

If you have any questions, we advise that you contact the Bureau of Motor Vehicles, at (888) 692-6841 to get further clarification.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-indiana/

50cc and over Law
Indiana Motor-Driven Cycles

Indiana classifies motor-driven cycles as follows:
Class A:
- Has an engine that produces 5 brake horsepower at most.
- Designed to have 3 wheels or fewer on the ground.
- Equipped with a seat or saddle for the rider.
Class B:
- Has an engine displacement of no more than 50 cc.
- Designed to have 3 wheels at most on the ground.
- Has a seat or saddle for the operator.

Both classes have license/endorsement, registration, and operating requirements.
Links: www.dmv.org/in-indiana/other-types.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
You must register your motor-driven cycle with the Indiana BMV by providing the following at your local IN BMV office:

Class A Licensing & Safety
Before you can ride your Class A motor-driven cycle, you’ll need to make sure you meet the Indiana Bureau of Motor Vehicles’ (BMV) licensing and safety law requirements.
Links: www.dmv.org/in-indiana/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
The state of Indiana requires all drivers to have a minimum amount of both underinsured and uninsured motorist coverage, which can pay for your injuries if the other driver isn't adequately insured.

Indiana Motorcycle Insurance Requirements
The minimum requirements for liability motorcycle insurance in Indiana are as follows:
- $25,000 bodily injury coverage for one person in a single accident.
- $50,000 bodily injury coverage total in a single accident for more than 1 person.
- $10,000 property damage coverage.

As you shop and get a motorcycle insurance quote, you might also want to look into higher coverage amounts or different types of coverage to make sure you're fully protected from financial risk, depending on your bike's condition and your financial situation. Be sure to check out the various types of insurance coverage available to you before making a final commitment.

Vehicle liability insurance is required.
Links: www.dmv.org/in-indiana/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
In Indiana, the law requires only those motorcycle drivers and riders under 18 to wear a helmet and protective glasses, goggles, or transparent face shields.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#indiana

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Iowa

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
Similar to bicycles, mopeds must have 2 or 3 wheels and a saddle (seat) that is designed to be used while riding. However, mopeds can go up to 30 mph on a flat surface without human-assisted propulsion (by using pedals.)

If you are under 18, you are required to carry a permit in order to ride, unless you are between ages 16 and 17 and have an intermediate license.

In order to obtain your permit, you are require to:
- Pass a driver’s written knowledge exam.
- Pass a standard vision test.
- Pass a skills test (unless stated otherwise.)

If you are over 18 years old and have a valid Iowa driver’s license, then you are not required to get a moped permit. If you are over 18 and do not have license, however, then you are still required to get the moped permit outlined above.

Mopeds also need to be registered, which can be done at your local county treasurer’s office. It is handled the same way as registering a motorcycle or car in Iowa.

You must follow all standard traffic laws while riding a moped, in addition to the following requirements:
- Mopeds must have a flag that is clearly visible. This flag must be at least 30 square inches in size, at least 5 feet from the ground, triangular in shape, and have a “day-glo” color.
- You cannot carry any passengers on a moped (only the rider.)
- You cannot carry a package that would prevent you from having both hands on the handlebars at all times.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-iowa/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Before riding a motorcycle in Iowa, you’ll need to register it with the IA Motor Vehicle Division (MVD).
Links: www.dmv.org/ia-iowa/motorcycle-registration.php

Insurance Laws
Although Iowa does not have a compulsory insurance law for motorcycle owners, the Financial & Safety Responsibility Act states that you will lose your license and registration privileges if you can't provide proof of motorcycle insurance or other acceptable forms of financial responsibility following an accident.
Links: /www.dmv.org/ia-iowa/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Iowa has no helmet law.
The Iowa legislature repealed its mandatory helmet law in 1976.
As of 2013, there is proposed legislation to reinstate a mandatory helmet law in Iowa.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#iowa

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Kansas

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In order for a motorbike to be classified as a moped, it must:
- Have 2 or 3 wheels.
- Have pedals or a motor (or both).
- Have a motor that produces no more than 3.5 brake hp, and is no bigger than 130 cc (if gas powered.)
- Be unable to exceed 30 mph on level ground.

If your motorbike exceeds the specifications listed above, then it is probably a motorcycle and must follow all of the motorcycle regulations and requirements.

Unlike bicycles, mopeds must be registered and insured, and you must have a standard Kansas driver’s license (or a moped license) to drive one. If you are under 18 years old, you are always required to wear a helmet when riding.

Unlike some states, you are allowed to drive a moped on Kansas highways, provided you obey the following regulations:
- If you are on a roadway that you cannot keep up with the normal speed of traffic, you must ride as close to the right side of the road as practical, unless you are preparing for a left turn.
- You must remain seated in the normal operating position while riding.
- You must wear eye protection.
- If you want to carry a passenger, your moped must be equipped with a permanently attached seat designed for carrying passengers.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-kansas/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
In Kansas, registration for both mopeds and scooters is just the same as it is for motorcycles. Please refer to your local DMV if you need more information about the motorcycle registration process. Typically, though, if you purchased your vehicle through a dealer then they will take care of the registration and titling for you.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-kansas/

Insurance Laws
In order to fulfill Kansas' motorcycle insurance requirements, you must have liability insurance to help cover costs associated with property damage or bodily injuries suffered by others in a crash for which you are found at fault.

Your motorcycle insurance policy must include the following:
- $25,000 per person for bodily injury.
- $50,000 per accident for bodily injury.
- $10,000 per accident for property damage.
Links: www.dmv.org/ks-kansas/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Kansas law requires all persons under 21 who operate or ride on a motorcycle or who ride in an attached sidecar to wear a helmet.

Helmets are also required to be worn by those drivers who have a motorcycle instruction permit and those who have held their motorcycle operator’s license for less than one year. Those driving under a permit are not permitted to carry passengers.

All motorcycle operators, regardless of age, must wear eye protection that has been approved by the Secretary of Transportation’s cabinet.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#kansas

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Kentucky

50cc and Under Law
In Kentucky, a moped is a bike that meets the following criteria:
- Has an engine that is smaller than 50 ccs and produces less than 2 horsepower.
- Has an automatic transmission.
- Is unable to propel itself more than 30 mph on a flat surface.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-kentucky/

50cc and over Law
Definition: Kentucky law defines a motorcycle as any motor-driven vehicle having a seat or saddle for the use by the operator and designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground, but excluding tractors and vehicles on which the operator and passengers ride in an enclosed cab, and excluding a moped.

Motor bikes, mini bikes, and any other small vehicles may not be operated upon the street or highway without first meeting the requirements for a motor vehicle, such as registration plate; and the operator must have a license to operate the vehicle.

The only place a driver may legally ride or operate this type of vehicle without an operator’s license and other safety equipment is on private property.
Links: kentuckystatepolice.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/motorcycle_rev_03_13_12_op.pdf

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
In order to ride a moped on public roadways, you will need a valid Kentucky drivers license (or a moped license), and need to make sure that your moped is registered. However, even with a license and registration, you cannot drive a moped on public roadways or highways that have a minimum speed limit higher than 30 mph.

You can apply for a moped license at a local County Clerk’s office. The application process is a lot like getting a driver’s permit, requiring a written exam to be passed, as well as a standard vision test.

Similar to mopeds, Scooters also require you to have a valid driver’s license in Kentucky.

If you are unsure about any of the above information, we advise that you contact your local County Clerks office, so that you do not accidentally break the law.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-kentucky/

Insurance Laws
In order to be compliant with Kentucky’s laws, you must purchase liability insurance for your motorcycle to help you pay for property damage or bodily injuries suffered by others in a crash that you cause.

Your liability motorcycle insurance policy must include the following minimum coverage limits per accident:
- $25,000 for bodily injury per person.
- $50,000 for total bodily injury if multiple people are hurt in the accident.
- $10,000 for property damage.

Keep in mind that these are just the state’s minimum requirements. You might want to consider buying higher limits for further protection.
Links: www.dmv.org/ky-kentucky/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Kentucky law requires all persons under 21 who operate or ride on a motorcycle or who ride in an attached sidecar to wear a helmet.

Helmets are also required to be worn by those drivers who have a motorcycle instruction permit and those who have held their motorcycle operator’s license for less than one year. Those driving under a permit are not permitted to carry passengers.

All motorcycle operators, regardless of age, must wear eye protection that has been approved by the Secretary of Transportation’s cabinet.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#kentucky

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Louisiana

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
It Louisiana, in order for a bike to be considered a motorized bicycle or moped, rather than a moped, scooter or motorcycle, it must:
- Have pedals that are designed to be used by the driver to assist with propulsion.
- Have a motor that can produce no more than 1.5 brake horsepower, and if gas powered, is no bigger than 50 cc.
- Has an automatic transmission.
- Be unable to go more than 25 mph on a flat surface.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-louisiana/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
You must have a valid Louisiana driver’s license to drive a moped, and you are not allowed to drive on interstate highways, sidewalks or footpaths. If you are between 15 and 16 years old, then you must be within 3 miles of your home while driving, unless you have a parent or guardian with you.

Interestingly, while you do need a driver’s license to drive a moped, you do not need one for motorcycles or scooters that have less than 5 hp.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-louisiana/

Insurance Laws
All motorized vehicles are required to be registered. To register, you will need to bring the following items to the OMV:
- Proof of insurance.
- A bill of sale for your vehicle.
- Title or certificate of origin.
- An odometer reading.
- Evidence of security of interest (form UCC-1 or equivalent.)

Titling your moped costs $18.50, plus an additional handling fee of $8, and additional taxes based on your location and purchase price of your moped. You must pay all fees with cash, check or money order (credit cards are not accepted.)

For further inquiries, we suggest contacting your local OMV at (225) 925-6146.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-louisiana/

Helmet Laws
In Louisiana, anyone who operates or rides on a motorcycle must wear a helmet that is secured with a chin strap at all times when the bike is in motion. Police authorities of a village, town, city, or parish may issue a permit exempting members of organizations sponsoring, conducting, or participating in parades or other public exhibitions from the helmet requirement, while such members are actually participating in a parade or other public exhibition. The helmet requirement does not apply to a person operating or riding in an auto-cycle if the vehicle is equipped with a roof which meets or exceeds standards for a safety helmet

In addition to chin straps, all helmets must consist of lining, padding, and a visor, and any other specifications that the Commissioner of the Department of Motor Vehicles may require.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#louisiana

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Maine

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In Maine, for a vehicle to be considered a moped, it must:
- Have 2 or 3 wheels that are at least 10 inches in diameter.
- Have a motor that is no bigger than 50 cc (if gas powered), or 1,500 watts (if electric).
- Have an automatic transmission (that does not require manual shifting of gears).
- Be unable to go more than 30 mph on a flat surface.
- Produce less than 2 brake horsepower.

Mopeds can also have foot pedals that are designed to assist with propulsion, but they are not required.

To drive a moped in Maine, you must be at least 16 years old and have a valid Maine driver’s license. Alternatively, you can also get a moped license if you do not have a driver’s license.

You must register your moped with the state of Maine before it can be driven on public roads, which has a small fee of $9.

When riding a moped, you must obey all regular traffic laws, in addition to the following:
- You must always drive on the farthest right side of the road, except when making a left turn.
- You cannot carry additional passengers unless the moped is designed to carry them.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-maine/

50cc and over Law
Two-Wheeled Vehicles Defined
Not all vehicles must be registered or insured in the state, so if you are not sure whether your vehicle requires registration or insurance coverage, contact the Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV) at (207) 624-9000, ext. 52149.

Here's how the state defines motorcycles, mopeds, and motorized scooters:
- Motorcycle—A motor vehicle with a seat or a saddle to accommodate a rider. It has either an electric motor (not less than 1,500 watts) or an engine with more than 50 cc, and is meant to travel on the ground with only 2 or 3 wheels (10 inches or larger in diameter).
- Moped—A motorized device with fully operative pedals for human-powered propulsion. It is designed for ground travel using only 2 or 3 wheels (10 inches or larger in diameter), and has either an electric motor (less than 1,500 watts) or a liquid-fuel motor not exceeding 50 cc. For more specifics on mopeds, the Maine Exam Manual.
- Motorized Scooter—Note that these do not include electric personal assistive mobility devices. Instead they are motor-powered scooters having a maximum piston displacement of less than 25 cc or an electric motor with a capacity not exceeding 750 watts. They travel on the ground using 2 or 3 wheels fewer than 10 inches in diameter.
Links: www.dmv.org/me-maine/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Getting a Moped License
As mentioned above, if you don’t have a driver’s license then you may opt to get a moped license instead. In order to get your license, you will need to pass a written exam.

If you are at least 16 years old and you do not already have a license, then you may get a learner’s permit instead. It will require a road test and you will need a parent or guardian to co-sign the application for you, and you need a valid proof of identification. The learners permit lasts for 2 years, and has a fee of $10.

In order to register by mail, you will need to mail the completed application, a copy of your ID, and a check to cover the cost of the fee and made payable to the Secretary of State to the following address:

Secretary of State
Bureau of Motor Vehicles
Examination Section
29 State House Station
Augusta, ME 04333

Once received, you should get a response indicating the time of your exam.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-maine/

Insurance Laws
Motorcycle Insurance Minimum Requirements in Maine
If you are a Maine resident who rides a motorcycle registered in the state, you must prove you can cover the cost of damages (either property or injury) in the case of an accident. To show proof that you ensure financial responsibility, you must carry liability motorcycle insurance, uninsured motorists coverage, and medical payments coverage.
Links: www.dmv.org/me-maine/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Maine law requires all motorcycle and sidecar passengers under 18 to wear a helmet. Motorcycle operators licensed within one year of completing their driver's test and those operating under learner's permits must also wear helmets.

When an operator is required to wear a helmet, Maine law also requires his or her passenger to wear a helmet.

Protective headgear must meet the minimum specifications set forth by the American National Standards Institute or the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#maine

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Maryland

50cc and Under Law
Scooters
In Maryland, scooters are defined as vehicles that:
- Have two wheels that are at least 10 inches in diameter.
- Have a seat that is designed to be used while operated.
- Have a step-through chassis (and a standing base).
- Have an automatic transmission.
- Have an attached motor that is no bigger than 50 cc (if gas powered), and produces no more than 2.7 brake horsepower.

If riding on public roadways, scooters cannot exceed 30 mph.

Mopeds
In Maine, motorized bicycles and mopeds fall under the same classifications.

In order for a motorbike to be considered a moped, it must:
- Have foot pedals for human-assisted propulsion.
- Have 2 or 3 wheels that are at least 14 inches in diameter.
- Have a motor that is no bigger than 50 cc, and produces no more than 1.5 brake horsepower.
- Cannot go more than 30 mph on level ground.

You are not required to register your moped, but you must have a valid driver’s license or permit and carry proof of insurance in order to drive it on public roadways.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-maryland/

50cc and over Law
Motorcycles
If your vehicle exceeds the above specifications then it is most likely considered to be a motorcycle, and must follow all standard motorcycle regulations (even if it is supposed to be designed as a scooter or moped.)

You must complete the Maryland Motorcycle Safety Program in order to get a registration for vehicles classified as motorcycles. For additional information or inquiries, we advise that you contact the Maryland Motor Vehicle Association.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-maryland/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Maryland vehicle law requires all motor scooters and mopeds to be titled and insured. All motor scooter and moped operators must hold a valid driver's license or a moped operator's permit and wear a helmet and eye protection. All motor scooters must display a title decal on the rear of the vehicle.
Links: www.mva.maryland.gov/about-mva/laws/new-scooter-laws.htm

Insurance Laws
Maryland vehicle law requires all motor scooters and mopeds to be titled and insured. All motor scooter and moped operators must hold a valid driver's license or a moped operator's permit and wear a helmet and eye protection. All motor scooters must display a title decal on the rear of the vehicle.
Links: www.mva.maryland.gov/about-mva/laws/new-scooter-laws.htm

Helmet Laws
In Maryland, all motorcycle drivers and passengers must wear a helmet. Additionally, all motorcycle operators must wear eye protection, unless the bike is equipped with a windscreen.

Helmets and eye protection must meet the standards established by Maryland's Administrator of Transportation, who approves safety gear and adopts/enforces standards and specifications for approval of safety gear. The Administrator publishes a list of all protective gear that is approved by name and type.

Because such standards are subject to change, it is advisable to check with the Administrator before driving or riding on a motorcycle in Maryland.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#maryland

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Massachusetts

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds In Massachusetts, motorized bicycles and mopeds fall under the same classification. In order for a motorbike to be considered a moped, it must meet the following requirements: - It must have an automatic transmission. - It must have a motor that is no bigger than 50 CC. - It must be unable to go more than 30 MPH on level ground (and must be operated at no more than 25 MPH). - It must comply with all applicable motor vehicle safety standards. You must have a valid drivers license and be at least 16 years old to drive a moped in Massachusetts, and you must always wear an approved safety helmet. Mopeds must be registered through the RMV, which carries a fee of $30, and must be renewed every 2 years.

Scooters
In Massachusetts, motorized scooters must follow the same rules and regulations as motorcycles. As such, you must have them registered, titled and tagged, and carry a valid motorcycle license to operate a motorized scooter on public roadways.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-massachusetts/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
The MA RMV requires registration for mopeds and motorized bikes, but a title is not required.

To register your moped or motorized bicycle, head to your nearest MA RMV service center with:
Proof of ownership; if the moped/motorized bike is:
- Used: Bill of sale.
- New: Manufacturer's certificate of origin.
- 2 copies of the Motorized Bicycle (Moped) Registration Certificate (Form T20017).
- The $40 registration fee.
- If you’re registering on or after November 1 you’ll owe $30 instead.

You’ll receive a stamped moped registration certificate and a decal to attach to your moped. Moped registrations are valid for 2 years.
Links: www.dmv.org/ma-massachusetts/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
The state minimums for Massachusetts motorcycle riders include:
Bodily injury to others—Minimum $20,000 per person, $40,000 per accident Damage to someone else's property—Minimum $5,000 for property damage
Links: www.dmv.org/ma-massachusetts/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Massachusetts law requires all motorcycle drivers and riders to wear helmets that conform to the minimum standards prescribed by the Registrar of Motor Vehicles.

The mandatory helmet law also applies to anyone riding in a sidecar.

Motorcycle operators must also wear eyeglasses, goggles, or a protective face shield, if the bike is not equipped with a windshield or screen.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#massachusetts

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Michigan

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In Michigan, motorized bicycles are considered to be mopeds. They are defined as as having the following:
- Has an engine that is no bigger than 50 CC, and produces no more than 2 brake horsepower.
- Is unable to propel itself 30 MPH or more on level ground.
- Has an automatic transmission.

If your motorbike exceeds the specifications above, then it is likely considered a motorcycle and you must abide by all motorcycle regulations while riding.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-michigan/

50cc and over Law
Mopeds

In Michigan, motorized bicycles are considered to be mopeds. They are defined as as having the following:
- Has an engine that is no bigger than 50 CC, and produces no more than 2 brake horsepower.
- Is unable to propel itself 30 MPH or more on level ground.
- Has an automatic transmission.

If your motorbike exceeds the specifications above, then it is likely considered a motorcycle and you must abide by all motorcycle regulations while riding.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-michigan/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Moped Laws
In order to ride a moped in Michigan, it must first be registered. Once registered, you must have a valid drivers license or moped license to drive it on public roads, and must be at least 15 years old.

You can apply for a for a moped license at 15 years old, but if you are under 18 then you will need a parent or legal guardian to cosign your application. You will need to pass a vision test, knowledge test and traffic sign test. You will also have to pay a licensing fee of $7.50, and renew it every 4 years (or when you turn 21.)

Note that if you already have a drivers license then you do not need to apply for a moped license.

Mopeds do not need to be titled, but they must be registered. To register your moped or motorized bicycle, make a trip to your local SOS (Secretary of State) office. You will need to provide a bill of sale (or manufacterer’s certificate of origin), and pay a registration fee of $15, which needs to be renewed every 3 years.

After registering, it is important to display your registration decal in a visible spot on the rear of your moped.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-michigan/

Insurance Laws
Motorcycle accidents happen all the time, and if one happens to you, the financial ramifications can be harsh.

Due to the possible expenses involved, the Secretary of State's (SOS) office demands that you be able to show a certain level of financial responsibility before allowing you to register your cycle. And, the only way to do this is by having a motorcycle insurance policy that meets the state's minimum requirements.
Links: www.dmv.org/mi-michigan/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
In Michigan, riders must wear helmets until they are age 21. Riders over 21 do not need to wear a helmet if:
A.) The person has had a motorcycle endorsement on his or her operator's license for at least 2 years or the person passes a motorcycle safety course;
B.) The person operating the motorcycle or the rider has in effect security for the first-party medical benefits payable in the event that he or she is involved in an accident (for a motorcycle operator without a rider, $20,000 or more; for a motorcycle operator with a rider, $20,000 per person per occurrence or more). However, if the rider has security of $20,000 or more, then the operator is only required to have security in the amount of $20,000 or more.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#michigan

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Minnesota

50cc and Under Law
Motorized Bicycles
In Minnesota, mopeds and motorized bicycles fall into the same classifications as far as the laws are concerned, except there are slight differences for electric-assisted bicycles.

In order for a motorized bicycle to be considered a moped, it must meet the following requirements:
- Have a motor that is no bigger than 50 cc, if gas powered, and produces no more than 2 brake horsepower.
- Is unable to go more than 30 mph on level ground.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-minnesota/

50cc and over Law
In Minnesota, two-wheel vehicles are defined as follows:
Motorcycle—A motorcycle:
- Is a motor vehicle with a seat or saddle for the use of the rider.
- Is designed to travel on not more than 3 wheels in contact with the ground.
- Includes motor scooters and bicycles with motor attached.
Links: www.dmv.org/mn-minnesota/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Moped Registration and Insurance
In order to drive your moped on public roads, you must get it titled and registered at a local DVS office. The registration process is similar to the process of registering a car, and must be renewed annually.

Moped drivers must also carry liability insurance. However, drivers of electric-assisted bicycles (or pedelecs) do not need to carry insurance.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-minnesota/

Insurance Laws
Moped Registration and Insurance
In order to drive your moped on public roads, you must get it titled and registered at a local DVS office. The registration process is similar to the process of registering a car, and must be renewed annually.

Moped drivers must also carry liability insurance. However, drivers of electric-assisted bicycles (or pedelecs) do not need to carry insurance.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-minnesota/

Helmet Laws
Under Minnesota law, all motorcycle operators and riders under 18 must wear a helmet. In addition, all operators driving a motorcycle under a learner's permit, regardless of age, must wear a helmet.

Those driving under a learner's permit are not allowed to carry passengers, nor can they drive on interstates at night.

Minnesota law also requires all motorcycle operators, regardless of age, to wear eye protection. All helmets and eye-protection devices must comply with the standards established by Minnesota's Commissioner of Public Safety.

The only exceptions to Minnesota's helmet and eye protection laws are for those participating in an officially-authorized parade and for those riding within an enclosed cab.

Because helmet and eye protection standards are subject to change, it is advisable to check with the Public Safety Commissioner before taking a motorcycle out on Minnesota roadways.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#minnesota

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Mississippi

50cc and Under Law
In general, mopeds are treated the same as motorcycles in Mississippi, so the laws that apply to motorcycles also apply to mopeds. You need a special endorsement on your driver’s license, and all riders must wear a helmet at all times.

We suggest that you contact your local MVL if you have additional questions about the laws in Mississippi.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-mississippi/

50cc and over Law
In general, mopeds are treated the same as motorcycles in Mississippi, so the laws that apply to motorcycles also apply to mopeds. You need a special endorsement on your driver’s license, and all riders must wear a helmet at all times.

We suggest that you contact your local MVL if you have additional questions about the laws in Mississippi.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-mississippi/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
In Mississippi, a moped or scooter must be tagged (with a license plate) if you want to drive it on public roadways. Although mopeds and scooters are not required to be titled through the Mississippi MVL (Motor Vehicle Licensing Bureau), you will need a title if you wish to sell them. For this reason, often times it is a good idea to get it titled while you are getting it tagged. You are not required to carry insurance.

In order to register your moped or scooter, you will need to follow many of the same procedures as you would when registering a motorcycle. You will need to bring the following to your local tax collectors office:
- A manufacturer’s certificate of origin, or original title if you bought it used.
- A bill of sale.
- A current odometer reading.
- Money to pay for the registration fee.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-mississippi/

Insurance Laws
Mississippi Motorcycle Insurance Requirements
Meeting the state’s minimum financial responsibility requirements is necessary to operate your motorcycle on state roads. To do this, purchase a liability insurance policy that provides:
- $25,000 per person per single accident
- $50,000 per accident for bodily injury
- $25,000 per accident for property damage

Remember, these are only the minimum requirements. As you are getting motorcycle insurance quotes, you should consider purchasing higher limits, especially if you own assets that can be lost in a lawsuit after a crash.
Links: www.dmv.org/ms-mississippi/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Mississippi law requires all motorcycle operators and riders to wear helmets of the type and design inspected and approved by the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#mississippi

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Missouri

50cc and Under Law
Motorized Bicycles
In Missouri, in order for a vehicle to be considered a motorized bicycle, it must:
- Have 2 or 3 wheels.
- Have an automatic transmission.
- Have a motor that is no bigger than 50 cc (if gas powered), and produces less than 3 brake horsepower.
- Have a maximum speed of 30 mph on a flat surface.

Motorized bicycles do not need to registered through the DMV.

Although wearing a helmet is not required, it is always highly recommended.

Mopeds and Scooters
If your motorbike exceeds the above requirements for motorized bicycles, then it is likely considered a moped or scooter.

Mopeds and scooters must follow all the same laws and requirements that motorcycles do, so you will need a motorcycle license to ride.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-missouri/

50cc and over Law
Generally, the Missouri DOR categorizes mopeds and scooters as motorized bikes as long as they meet the criteria above. If your moped or scooter falls into the motorized bike category, you’ll need to follow the same licensing, registration, and riding requirements.

However, if your moped or scooter exceeds the specs of motorized bikes, it’s likely you have a motorcycle which does require a motorcycle license or endorsement and registration.
Links: www.dmv.org/mo-missouri/other-types.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Generally, the Missouri DOR categorizes mopeds and scooters as motorized bikes as long as they meet the criteria above. If your moped or scooter falls into the motorized bike category, you’ll need to follow the same licensing, registration, and riding requirements.

However, if your moped or scooter exceeds the specs of motorized bikes, it’s likely you have a motorcycle which does require a motorcycle license or endorsement and registration.
Links: www.dmv.org/mo-missouri/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
To fulfill Missouri's motorcycle insurance requirements, you must have liability insurance to help cover costs associated with property damage and bodily injuries suffered by other in an accident you cause.

Your motorcycle insurance policy must include the following minimum coverage limits per accident:
- $25,000/person for bodily injury
- $50,000/accident for bodily injury
- $10,000/accident for property damage
Links: www.dmv.org/mo-missouri/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Every person operating or riding as a passenger on any motorcycle or motortricycle on any highway in Missouri must wear protective headgear at all times while the vehicle is in motion. The protective headgear must meet reasonable standards and specifications as established by the Director of Motor Vehicles.

Because these standards and specifications are subject to change, it's best to check with the Director before riding on a motorcycle in Missouri.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#missouri

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Montana

50cc and Under Law
In Montana, a motorized bicycle or moped is any vehicle that meets the following requirements: Has 2 or 3 wheels.Has a maximum speed of 30 MPH on level ground.Has a motor that is no bigger than 50 CC, and produces no more than 2 brake horsepower.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-montana/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
In Montana, scooters must be titled and registered as you would with a motorcycle AND you do still need a valid driver’s license and proof of insurance.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-montana/

Insurance Laws
You do need proof of insurance.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-montana/

Helmet Laws
Any operator or passenger younger than 18 years old MUST wear a helmet while riding a motorcycle.
Links: www.dmv.org/motorcycles/motorcycle-helmet-laws.php

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Nebraska

50cc and Under Law
Motorized Bicycles
In Nebraska, a motorized bicycle or moped is defined as a bike with the following characteristics:
- It has pedals that are designed to be used by the rider to propel the bike.
- It has an automatic transmission.
- It has a motor that is no bigger than 50 CC, and produces 2 brake horsepower or less.
- It has a maximum speed of 30 MPH on a flat surface.

If your bike does not have pedals (even if they are temporarily removed), then it is restricted to off-road use only unless it meets the minimum requirements for a motorcycle (in which case it must meet all of the motorcycle laws and regulations.)

Mopeds do not need to be registered, or titles, and you are not required to carry insurance. However, you do need a valid driver’s license to drive one on public roads.

Scooters
In Nebraska, motorized scooters have a lot of the same regulations as motorcycles.

You should consider your scooter to be a motorcycle if meets the following criteria:
It has tires that are bigger than 14 inches in diameter.
It has a motor/engine that produces at least 45 ccs.

If it meets the above criteria, then you will need to get it titled and registered, and will have to follow the other motorcycle laws. As such, you will also need a motorcycle license.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-nebraska/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Mopeds in Nebraska
In Nebraska, a moped is defined as a motor vehicle that has:
Pedals for human propulsion.
An automatic transmission.
A motor that:
- Has an engine capacity of no more than 50 cc.
- Produces no more than 2 brake horsepower.
- Can propel the moped no faster than 30 MPH on flat ground.

You must have at least a basic driver’s license to operate a moped.

You can operate your moped on public roads without titling or registering it as long as you don’t remove the pedals. If you remove the pedals, you can drive the moped on private property only unless it meets the requirements of a motorcycle. At that point, you must title and register it as a motorcycle, and obtain a motorcycle license or endorsement.
Links: www.dmv.org/ne-nebraska/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
Motorcycle Insurance Minimum Requirements in Nebraska
All state residents who ride must, by law, maintain proof of financial responsibility. Most riders honor this obligation with motorcycle insurance.
Links: www.dmv.org/ne-nebraska/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Nebraska requires all motorcycle drivers and passengers to wear a helmet with a chin strap secured at all times when the bike is in motion.

In addition to a chin strap, Nebraska law also requires the helmet to consist of lining and padding that meets or exceeds federal regulations.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#nebraska

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Nevada

50cc and Under Law
“Moped” means a motor-driven scooter, motor-driven cycle or similar vehicle that is propelled by a small engine which produces not more than 2 gross brake horsepower, has a displacement of not more than 50 cubic centimeters or produces not more than 1500 watts final output, and is capable of a maximum speed of not more than 30 miles per hour on a flat surface with not more than 1 percent grade in any direction when the motor is engaged.
Links: dmvnv.com/moped.htm

50cc and over Law
“Motorcycle” means every motor vehicle designed to travel on not more than three wheels in contact with the ground, except any such vehicle as may be included within the term “electric bicycle,” “tractor” or “moped” as defined in this chapter.
Links: dmvnv.com/moped.htm

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Vehicle registration and a license plate are required in Nevada. Owners must register their vehicle one time only. The registration will remain valid as long as the owner retains the vehicle. Annual renewal is not required. You must hold a driver’s license (any class) to operate a moped on public streets. A Class M motorcycle license is not required.
Links: dmvnv.com/moped.htm

Insurance Laws
Liability insurance is not required
Links: dmvnv.com/moped.htm

Helmet Laws
Helmet use is not required.
Links: dmvnv.com/moped.htm

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New Hampshire

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In New Hampshire, mopeds must be registered, but they do not require you to carry proof of insurance or follow the other regulations of motorcycles.

In order for your motorbike to be classified as a moped, however, it must meet the following requirements:
- It must have a motor/engine that is no bigger than 50 cc, and produces 2 brake horsepower or less.
- It must have an automatic transmission.
- It is incapable of going more than 30 mph on a flat surface.

If your scooter or motorbike does not meet all of the requirements above, then it is most likely classified as a motorcycle and must follow all of the motorcycle laws and regulations.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-new-hampshire/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Licensing and Registration
In New Hampshire, you need to carry a valid driver’s license or a moped license, and a registration in order to ride on public roads. When applying for a moped license, keep in mind that you will need to pass a written knowledge exam.

When registering your moped, you will need to bring the Manufacturer’s Statement of Origin (MSO), or a bill of sale. You’ll also need to bring $3 for the registration fee.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-new-hampshire/

Insurance Laws
Motorcycle Insurance Minimum Requirements in New Hampshire
You don't have to carry vehicle liability insurance—or show any proof of financial responsibility—to drive your motorcycle within the state. At least, not initially.

But, the New Hampshire Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) may require you to purchase motorcycle insurance and file a SR-22 liability policy if any of the following occur:
- Being involved in an accident.
- A conviction for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.
- Multiple reckless driving convictions.
- A traffic violation conviction that triggers a review.
Links: www.dmv.org/nh-new-hampshire/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
While New Hampshire hasn't had a helmet law since the National Highway System Designation Act passed in 1995, riders under the age of 18 are required to wear helmets.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#new-hampshire

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New Jersey

50cc and Under Law
Motorized Bicycles
In the State of New Jersey, a motorized bicycle or moped is defined as a bicycle that also has the following characteristics:
- Has a motor that is less than 50 ccs (if powered by gas), and produces 1.5 brake horsepower or less.
- Can’t propel itself faster than 25 mph on level ground.

It’s important to note that motor driven tricycles are not legal to operate on public roadways.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-new-jersey/

50cc and over Law
NJ motor scooter laws
A motorcycle is any vehicle (including motor bikes, bicycles and tricycles, aka trike) with attached motors. All residents operating a motorcycle in New Jersey must have a motorcycle endorsement on their existing driver license or a separate motorcycle license. All motorcycles must be titled, registered and insured.
Links: www.state.nj.us/mvc/vehicletopics/motorcycle.htm

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
To drive a moped on public roads in New Jersey, you need to possess a valid driver’s license, registration and insurance; you can be fined up to $50 if caught driving without them.

You will need to register your moped at a local MVC (Motor Vehicle Commission) Agency. When registering, you will need to bring:
- A certificate of origin, or the current title and registration papers.
- A Bill of Sale.
- Proof of insurance.

Once registered, there is another list of regulations that is important to know before you ride.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-new-jersey/

Insurance Laws
To legally operate a motorcycle in New Jersey you must provide proof of financial responsibility. Compliance for most riders comes in the form of motorcycle insurance.

Read more to learn about New Jersey's motorcycle insurance requirements.

NOTE: New Jersey has some of the most unique car insurance laws in the country. With this in mind, it is important to understand that while most states' car and motorcycle insurance requirements mirror each other, New Jersey's motorcycle insurance requirements do not compare to its car insurance requirements.
Links: www.dmv.org/nj-new-jersey/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
In New Jersey, all motorcycle operators and passengers must wear a securely-fitted helmet of a size proper for the wearer's head and of a type approved by New Jersey's Director of Motor Vehicles.

Helmets must be equipped with either a neck or chin strap and it must be 'reflectorized' on both sides. In addition, protective eyewear is required for all motorcycle operators.

The Motor Vehicle Director is authorized and empowered to adopt rules and regulations covering the types of approved helmets and their specifications and to establish and maintain a list of approved helmets that meet those specifications.

Because these rules are regulations are subject to change, it is advisable to check with the Motor Vehicle Director before riding on a motorcycle in New Jersey.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#new-jersey

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New Mexico

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In New Mexico, mopeds are defined as bikes with the following attributes:
- They have 2 or 3 wheels.
- They have an automatic transmission.
- They have a motor that is 50 cc or less.
- They can’t go faster than 30 mph on level ground.

If your bike meets the above requirements, then you don’t need get it titled, registered, and you don’t need to carry insurance – just a valid drivers license.

However, if your motorbike exceeds the specifications above, then it is most likely classified as a motorcycle in New Mexico, and you must abide by all of the motorcycle laws and regulations.

Scooters
Just as with mopeds, scooters can also fit into the motorcycle classification. Using the same requirements as listed above for mopeds, compare your scooter and make sure you understand how your scooter is classified, and follow the appropriate procedures.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-new-mexico/

50cc and over Law
Motorcycles Defined
Before you spend time looking motorcycle insurance, first figure out if you even need it. Not all two-wheeled vehicles with motors are defined as motorcycles, and if it’s not a motorcycle, you don’t need to register, title, or insure it.

Motorcycle—The state considers a motorcycle as having a seat/saddle for the rider and no more than 3 wheels. Moped/Scooter—A moped or scooter doesn't require registration or insurance—just a driver's license. Your ride is a moped or scooter if it:
- Has no more than three wheels.
- Has an automatic transmission.
- Has an engine less than 50 cc.
- Can't travel faster than 30 mph on flat ground.

NOTE: If what you call a moped or scooter meets the motorcycle criteria, chances are you'll need to register and insure it. If you're not sure, or need more information, contact the Motor Vehicle Division at (888) 683-4636.
Links: www.dmv.org/nm-new-mexico/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Mopeds
Mopeds are defined as vehicles with:
- 2 or 3 wheels.
- An automatic transmission.
- A motor with a piston displacement of less than 50 ccs (cubic centimeters).
- A maximum speed capability of 30 MPH on a level surface.

Moped Registration and Titling
If a vehicle exceeds the speed or piston displacement criteria, it will be classified as a motorcycle. You'll then to register and title the vehicle, and carry insurance.

For a moped, you won't to do any of this. You will need any sort of driver's license or permit, however, to ride one.

Scooters
Depending on its makeup, a scooter could be classified as a motorcycle, moped, or even a bicycle. So, see where your vehicle falls under these categories, and follow the appropriate riding rules as well as registration and titling procedures.
Links: www.dmv.org/nm-new-mexico/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
New Mexico Motorcycle Insurance Requirements
If you don't post a surety bond, you must buy motorcycle insurance to be legal on your bike. Not only will insurance protect the other drivers, it will protect you and your assets from getting liquidated in the event of a bad accident.

The minimum coverage limits you must have as part of your policy are:
$25,000 for bodily injury or death of one person
$50,000 per accident for bodily injury to or death of two or more people
$10,000 per accident for property damage
Links: www.dmv.org/nm-new-mexico/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Under New Mexico law, only those motorcycle operators and passengers under 18 are required to wear a helmet.

Those subject to the law must wear helmets that are securely fastened and that meet the standards specified by New Mexico's Director of Transportation.

Because these standards are subject to change, you should check with the Director before taking to the open road in New Mexico.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#new-mexico

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New York

50cc and Under Law
Class B Motorized Bikes
Class B motorbikes have a top speed between 20 mph and 30 mph.
Like Class C bikes, you have a similar set of rules that you need to follow:
- You must have a valid driver’s license (of any class.)
- Your bike must be registered.
- You must have a working headlight on while driving.
- You are required to carry insurance.
- You are required to wear a helmet and eye protection at all times while riding.
- You do not need to get your bike titled.
- You do not need to get your bike inspected.
- You must drive in the right hand lane whenever or on the should whenever possible, but not on the sidewalk.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-new-york/

50cc and over Law
Class A Motorized Bikes
Class A motorbikes approach the capability, and thus, the requirements of standard motorcycles.

If you bike has a top speed between 30 mph and 40 mph, then it is a Class A motorized bike, and you must abide by the following:
- You need a valid Class M/MJ driver’s license (a motorcycle license.)
- You must have your bike registered.
- You must have a working headlight on while riding.
- You must wear a helmet and eye protection at all times.
- You need to carry insurance.
- You need to get your bike inspected.
- You do not need to get your bike titled.
- You can drive in any of the traffic lanes.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-new-york/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Registering Your Bike
As you can see above, all classes of motorized bikes need to be registered through the DMV.

To register your bike, bring the following items to your local DMV office:
- Valid identification.
- A completed MV-82 form (Vehicle Registration/Title Application.)
- A proof of ownership, via a Manufacturer’s Certificate of Origin (MCO), a bill of sale, or the previous registration.
- Some cash, a check or credit card to pay the registration fees.

The cost of registration will vary slightly depending on the weight of your vehicle.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-new-york/

Insurance Laws
New York Moped and Scooter Insurance Requirements
In the state of New York, valid insurance is required for vehicles falling into either Class A or Class B, and is recommended for Class C. If you use a rental moped or scooter for business practices, then Class C will also require insurance.

Once you are licensed, and your vehicle is registered, inspected, and has adequate minimum insurance, you will be ready to legally operate your moped or scooter.
Links: www.dmv.org/ny-new-york/other-types.php

Helmet Laws
New York law requires all motorcycle drivers and riders to wear helmets that comply with federal law.

Police authorities of cities, towns, and villages may issue permits exempting members of organizations sponsoring or conducting parades or other public exhibitions from wearing helmets while they are participating.

In addition, New York requires all motorcycle operators to wear goggles or a face shield of a type approved by the Commissioner of the Department of Motor Vehicles. The Commissioner is authorized and empowered to adopt and amend regulations covering the types of permissible goggles and face shields and their specifications. To make sure your eye protection meets the Commissioner's standards, check with the Department of Motor Vehicles.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#new-york

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North Carolina

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds and Scooters
In the state of North Carolina, mopeds and scooters are defined as a bike with the following characteristics:
- It has 2 or 3 wheels.
- It has a motor that is no bigger than 50 cc.
- It has a top speed of 30 mph on a flat surface.

If your motorbike exceeds the above specifications, then it is likely considered a motorcycle and you must abide by all of the motorcycle laws.
Links: www.ncdot.gov/dmv/title-registration/vehicle/Pages/moped-requirements.aspx

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
?North Carolina law requires all mopeds that are operated on a state-maintained road to be registered with the N.C. Division of Motor Vehicles. Unlike other vehicles, however, they do not have to be titled.

State law also requires mopeds be covered under liability insurance coverage with limits no less than $30,000/$60,000/$25,000. Failure to maintain liability insurance coverage constitutes a lapse and may result in the revocation of the North Carolina license plate.

Furthermore, you don’t even need a driver’s license to ride a moped in NC, making it one of the most lenient states in the U.S. for motorized bicycle requirements.

However, you do have to be at least 16 years old, and obey the following regulations:
- You must wear a helmet while riding.
- You need to drive in the right-hand lane.
- You cannot drive while intoxicated.
- You should stay out of traffic as must as practical.
- You can’t share lanes with other vehicles.
- You should wear bright colored clothing.
- Never drive between cars in traffic.

Lastly, you should always use electric turn signals or hand signals when stopping or turning.
Links: www.ncdot.gov/dmv/title-registration/vehicle/Pages/moped-requirements.aspx

Insurance Laws
If your bike is considered to be a moped in North Carolina, then you do not need to have it registered, titled or inspected, and you are not required to carry insurance.

Furthermore, you don’t even need a driver’s license to ride a moped in NC, making it one of the most lenient states in the U.S. for motorized bicycle requirements.

However, you do have to be at least 16 years old, and obey the following regulations:
- You must wear a helmet while riding.
- You need to drive in the right-hand lane.
- You cannot drive while intoxicated.
- You should stay out of traffic as must as practical.
- You can’t share lanes with other vehicles.
- You should wear bright colored clothing.
- Never drive between cars in traffic.

Lastly, you should always use electric turn signals or hand signals when stopping or turning.
Links: www.ncdot.gov/dmv/title-registration/vehicle/Pages/moped-requirements.aspx

Helmet Laws
If your bike is considered to be a moped in North Carolina, then you do not need to have it registered, titled or inspected, and you are not required to carry insurance.

Furthermore, you don’t even need a driver’s license to ride a moped in NC, making it one of the most lenient states in the U.S. for motorized bicycle requirements.

However, you do have to be at least 16 years old, and obey the following regulations:
- You must wear a helmet while riding.
- You need to drive in the right-hand lane.
- You cannot drive while intoxicated.
- You should stay out of traffic as must as practical.
- You can’t share lanes with other vehicles.
- You should wear bright colored clothing.
- Never drive between cars in traffic.

Lastly, you should always use electric turn signals or hand signals when stopping or turning.
Links: www.ncdot.gov/dmv/title-registration/vehicle/Pages/moped-requirements.aspx

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North Dakota

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In order for your bike to be considered a moped in North Dakota, it must meet the following requirements:
- It must have 2 or 3 wheels.
- It must have pedals or a footrest.
- It must have a motor/engine, and a top speed of 30 mph on level ground.
- It must have an automatic transmission.
- It can’t be wider than 32 inches.

Additionally, you are required to abide by the following requirements if you want to drive on public roads:
- You must be at least 14 years old and have a driver’s license, or a motorized bicycle/instruction/temporary permit (motorcycle endorsement is not required.)
- You must get your moped registered and titled through the North Dakota Department of Transportation (NDDOT).
- You must carry liability insurance.
- You must wear a helmet at all times if under 18 years old (though it is still recommended if you are over 18.)
- You must obey all normal traffic laws, which can vary slightly depending on your city.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-north-dakota/

50cc and over Law
Scooters
If your motorbike is a scooter rather than a moped, it must still meet the top speed requirements, otherwise it is classified as a motorcycle and must follow all of the motorcycle laws.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-north-dakota/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Moped Registration
When registering your moped, you should bring the following to your local DOT office:
A manufacturer’s Certificate of Origin (MCO), or the current title and registration documents signed over to you.
An odometer certification.
Proof of insurance.
Cash or check to pay for the $25 registration fee (plus 5% tax.), plus an additional title fee of $5.

If you have any further questions, we recommend that you contact the Motor Vehicle Division, at (701) 328-2725.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-north-dakota/

Insurance Laws
North Dakota Motorcycle Insurance Requirements
To be compliant with North Dakota's motorcycle insurance laws, you are required to have liability insurance on your bike, which helps pay for bodily injuries of property damage to others in an accident that you cause.

Your motorcycle insurance policy must include the following minimum coverage limits per accident:
- $25,000— For bodily injury per person.
- $50,000—For total bodily injury if multiple people are hurt in the crash.
- $25,000— for property damage
Links: www.dmv.org/nd-north-dakota/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Under North Dakota law, all motorcycle operators and passengers under 18 must wear helmets that comply with standards adopted by the state's Department of Motor Vehicles. If an operator is under 18, his or her passenger must also wear a helmet, regardless of the passenger's age.

The only exception to North Dakota's helmet law is for those participating in authorized parades and those riding in an enclosed cab or golf carts. To check current compliance standards, contact the North Dakota Department of Motor Vehicles.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#north-dakota

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Ohio

50cc and Under Law
The State of Ohio classifies electric bikes and motorized bicycles as mopeds. However, in order for a bike to be considered a moped in Ohio, it must meet the following criteria:
- It must have 2 or 3 wheels that are at least 19 inches in diameter.
- It must have pedals and a helper motor that can propel the vehicle.
- The helper motor cannot exceed 50 CC.
- The helper motor cannot produce more than 1 brake horsepower.
- The helper motor must be unable to propel the vehicle more than 20 mph on a flat surface.

If your bike exceeds the above requirements, then it is considered to be a motorcycle and you must abide by all of the standard motorcycle laws and regulations.

Scooters
In Ohio, motor scooters are classified as motorcycles, and must abide by the same requirements and regulations. As such, you must be at least 16 years old and have a motorcycle license or motorcycle endorsement on your driver’s license.

In order for a scooter to be considered roadworthy, it must meet the following requirements:
- It must have a seat or saddle.
- It must have a headlight, brake lights, turn signals, a horn and rear view mirrors.
- It must have 2 or 3 wheels.

Scooters must also be titled, registered and have valid license plates in order to be driven on public roads.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-ohio/

50cc and over Law
Any person operating a motorcycle or motor scooter on public roadways in Ohio must hold a valid motorcycle or motor scooter license or endorsement. A rider may apply for a motorcycle or motor scooter-only license or a motorcycle or motor scooter endorsement for his or her driver license. A motorcycle or motor scooter license is issued if the rider does not have a valid driver license. A motorcycle or motor scooter endorsement is displayed on an individual’s driver license.A rider is considered a motorcycle or motor scooter novice for one year. The license will indicate the date the novice status expires.
Links: www.bmv.ohio.gov/dl-mo-motorcycle.aspx

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
You must have either a valid driver’s license or a motorized bicycle license in order to drive a moped on public roads. Note that a motorized bicycle license is not the same thing as a motorcycle license, and you are not required to have one if you have a valid driver’s license.

Although you do not need to get your moped titled, you do need to get it registered and obtain a valid license plate. The registration process is very much like registering a car; it must be renewed annually, and there is a minimum registration fee of $24.50.

Getting Your Motorized Bicycle License
In order to get a motorized bicycle license, you will need to pass a written knowledge test and a vision test at your local Driver License Exam Station.

Once passed, you will need to go to a deputy registrar office and get your motorized bicycle TIPIC (bring your receipt for the knowledge exam, and proof of your name, date of birth and SSN.)

After getting some riding practice, you will need to schedule and take a driving skills test. Bring your TIPIC to the exam station. You will be tested at an off-street course, and you must bring your motorized bicycle, helmet and eye protection.

Once you pass your driving skills test, you can apply for your motorized bicycle license. You will need to bring your TIPIC, your receipt from the on-cycle driving skills test, and payment for the $21 licensing fee.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-ohio/

Insurance Laws
Motorcycle Insurance Minimum Requirements in Ohio
It's a clear-cut issue: You can't legally drive a vehicle within the state unless you have current motorcycle insurance coverage that meets the state's minimum requirements, or you can provide proof you meet the state's other financial responsibility standards.

Your motorcycle insurance policy must at least meet these standards:
- $25,000 bodily injury coverage for 1 person in an accident.
- $50,000 bodily injury coverage for an accident involving two or more persons.
- $25,000 property damage coverage.
Links: www.dmv.org/oh-ohio/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
In Ohio, all motorcycle operators under 18 and those who hold a "novice license" must wear a helmet. Ohio issues "novice licenses" to motorcycle operators 18 or older who have never previously been licensed to operate a motorcycle in Ohio or any other state or another jurisdiction recognized by Ohio law.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#ohio

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Oklahoma

50cc and Under Law
In Oklahoma, a moped is a motorized bicycle with the following characteristics:
- It has both pedals and a motor that can propel the vehicle.
- It has an automatic transmission.
- The helper motor is no bigger than 50 CC.
- It cannot go more than 30 mph on level ground.

Additionally, Oklahoma has a separate definition for an “electric-assisted bicycle”. In order to be considered an electric-assisted bicycle, your bike must meet the following requirements:
- It has both pedals and a motor.
- The helper motor is no bigger than 1,000 watts.
- It cannot propel itself more than 20 mph on level ground.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-oklahoma/

50cc and over Law
If you're unclear on whether or not your two-wheeled vehicle requires registration, which would necessitate insurance, call the Oklahoma Tax Commission (OTC) at (800) 522-8165.

The state defines two-wheeled vehicles as:
- Motorcycle—Any motor vehicle having a seat or saddle for the use of each rider; possessing not more than 3 wheels in contact with the ground, but excluding a tractor; and having a combustion engine with a piston or rotor displacement of greater than 150 cc.
- Moped/Scooter—Even though they're generally smaller and pack less punch, some mopeds and scooters require titling, registration, and insurance. Contact the OTC for details
Links: www.dmv.org/ok-oklahoma/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Moped Licensing, Titling and Registration
Although mopeds are not considered to be motorcycles, they must still be registered, tagged and titled in Oklahoma.

It’s important to note that you must apply for your title within 30 days of owning your moped. You will have to apply for your title through the MVD (Motor Vehicle Division), or at any of the tag agencies in the state of Oklahoma, and pay a titling fee of $11.

You’ll also need a Class A, B, C or D driver’s license.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-oklahoma/

Insurance Laws
Your motorcycle insurance policy must contain liability insurance with the following minimum coverage types per accident:
- $25,000—Injury or death of one person.
- $50,000—Injury or death of two or more persons.
- $25,000—For property damage.
Links: www.dmv.org/ok-oklahoma/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Oklahoma law requires only those motorcycle operators and passengers under 18 to wear helmets. Headgear must contain lining, padding, and chin straps, and it must not distort the view of the driver.

Operators of all ages, however, must wear goggles or a face shield of a material and design that protects the driver from foreign objects, unless the bike is equipped with a windshield of sufficient quality, size, and thickness to protect the operator from foreign objects.

Oklahoma's helmet laws are governed by the Commissioner of the Department of Public Safety. Because regulations are subject to change, it's best to check with the Commissioner before riding on a motorcycle, either as a driver or passenger, in Oklahoma.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#oklahoma

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Oregon

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In order for a vehicle to be considered a moped, it must:
- Have 3 wheels or less.
- Have a seat (rather than a standing base)
- Have an automatic transmission.
- Have a motor between 35.01 and 50 cc.
- Be unable to go more than 30 mph on level ground.

Mopeds need to be registered through the DMV, and require a drivers license to ride.

Scooters
In order for a vehicle to be defined as a scooter, it must:
- Have a gas-powered engine up to 35 cc, or an electric motor up to 1,000 watts.
- Be unable to go more than 24 mph on level ground.
Unlike mopeds, scooters do not need to be registered through the DMV.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-oregon/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Mopeds need to be registered through the DMV, and require a drivers license to ride.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-oregon/

Insurance Laws
According to Oregon's motorcycle insurance laws, you are required to have liability insurance to help cover costs associated with property damage or bodily injuries you cause to others in an accident for which you are found at-fault.
Links: www.dmv.org/or-oregon/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
You must wear a helmet compliant to U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) standards. You should wear face and eye protection. Oregon requires you to wear a DOT-compliant motorcycle helmet whenever you ride a motorcycle, moped or unenclosed autocycle as either an operator or passenger.
Links: www.oregon.gov/odot/forms/dmv/6367.pdf

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Pennsylvania

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In order for a motorized bike to be classified as a moped in the state on Pennsylvania, it must meet the following requirements:
- It must have both pedals and a motor that can propel the vehicle.
- The motor must not be bigger than 50 CC, and it must produce no more than 5 brake horsepower.
- It must have a top speed of 25 mph.
- It must have an automatic transmission.

You will need a valid Class C driver’s license to drive your moped on public roads. Additionally, you will need to get your moped registered (which is renewed annually) for a small fee of $9. Once registered, you will be issued a moped license plate which must be properly fitted and displayed on your moped.

You are not required to wear a helmet or eye protection while riding, but it is highly recommended.

Scooters
Scooters are defined as “motor-driven cycles” in Pennsylvania, and fall somewhere in between moped and motorcycle regulations. To be considered a motor-driven cycle, your scooter must have a motor that produces no more than 5 brake horsepower.

Unlike mopeds, scooters are required to be inspected, and you will be issued a regular motorcycle license plate.

You need wear eye protection at all times while driving a motor-driven cycle. You must also wear a helmet if you are under 21 years old.

Lastly, you will need a Class M driver’s license to operate a motor-driven cycle; if you have a Class M license with an “8” restriction, then you scooter’s motor must be smaller than 50 CCs.

If your motor scooter exceeds the specifications outlined above, then it is considered a motorcycle, and you must obey all of the motorcycle laws and requirements.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-pennsylvania/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
As a Pennsylvanian, you must register your motorcycle with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) before riding on the road is allowed.

To get a Class M (Motorcycle) license, an individual must pass a basic motorcycle knowledge test and apply for a Class M learner's permit. The learner's permit allows the applicant to ride only between sunrise and sunset and, except for a rider licensed to operate another class of vehicle, only while under the instruction and supervision of an individual who holds a Class M license. Class M permit holders cannot carry any passengers other than an instructor properly licensed to operate a motorcycle. The permit is valid for 1 year. The cost of the permit is $10.00.

If you are under 18, you must have your permit for at least 6 months and have 65 hours of supervised riding before taking your skills test. In addition, you must take and successfully complete a Pennsylvania Motorcycle Safety Program Basic Rider Course, which counts as 15 hours of supervised riding toward the 65-hour requirement, before you can receive your motorcycle license.

Please note that you may reapply for a motorcycle learner's permit no more than three (3) times in a five (5) year period (four (4) total leaner's permits within the five (5) years). You must successfully pass the motorcycle knowledge test each time you apply for a learner's permit.
Links: www.dmv.pa.gov/Driver-Services/Motorcyclists/Pages/Motorcycle-License.aspx

Insurance Laws
Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) requires motorcycle owners to prove they're capable of handling the possible costs involved by meeting the state's financial responsibility requirements. This is done by having acceptable levels of motorcycle liability insurance, or through self-insurance.

Pennsylvania Motorcycle Insurance Requirements

To meet the state's motorcycle insurance requirements, you must have at least the following amounts and types of coverage:
- $15,000 of bodily injury protection for injuries or death occurring to one person in an accident.
- $30,000 of bodily injury protection for injuries or deaths occurring to more than one person in an accident.
- $5,000 of property damage protection for a single accident.
Links: www.dmv.org/pa-pennsylvania/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Pennsylvania repealed its mandatory helmet law in 2003.

Motorcycle operators 21 years of age and older, who have either been licensed to operate a motorcycle for at least two years or who have completed a motorcycle rider safety course approved by the Department of Motor Vehicles or the Motorcycle Safety Foundation, are not required to wear helmets.

Passengers who are 21 and older are permitted to ride on motorcycles without helmets, so long as the operator of the bike is not legally required to wear a helmet.

Riders with a motorcycle learner's permit are required to wear a helmet.

Those riding in a three-wheeled motorcycle equipped with an enclosed cab are not required to wear helmets.

All motorcycle operators and riders under 21, however, must wear helmets, regardless of how long the operator has been licensed or whether he or she has completed a safety course.

All motorcycle operators and riders are required to wear eye protection that is approved by the Department of Motor Vehicles.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#pennsylvania

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Rhode Island

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In order for a motorbike to be considered a moped in Rhode Island, it has to meet the following specifications:
- It has 2 wheels.
- It has both pedals and a motor that can propel the bike.
- The motor has a cylinder capacity that is less than 50 CC (cubic centimeters).
- It has a top speed of 30 MPH on level ground.

If your bike meets all of the above requirements, then it is considered to be a moped! On the other hand, if it exceeds the specifications then it is most likely considered to be a motorcycle and you must follow all of the motorcycle laws and regulations.

Scooters
Similar to mopeds, Scooters are defined as motorbikes that meet the following requirements:
- It must have a motor that is no bigger than 50 CC.
- It has a top speed of 30 MPH on level ground.

The main difference between scooters and mopeds is that scooters don’t have pedals to help with propulsion. If your scooter exceeds these specifications, then it is considered a motorcycle and you must follow all of the motorcycle laws and regulations.

You need to follow the same laws outlined above for mopeds if you plan to drive your scooter on public roads.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-rhode-island/

50cc and over Law
Two-Wheeled Vehicles Defined
Confused whether your cycle qualifies as a motorcycle under state law? Call the DMV at (401) 462-4368 for more information.

Or, read how the state defines the following vehicles:
- Motorized bicycle—A two-wheeled vehicle that can't reach speeds of over 30 MPH on a flat surface; it can be propelled by human power, motor power, or both.
- Motor Scooter—A motor-driven cycle with a cylinder capacity of less than 50 cc that can't reach speeds of over 30 MPH on a flat surface; it can only be propelled by motor power. The vehicle's motor must be no more than 4.9 hp.

If your two-wheeled vehicle exceeds these limits, the DMV will likely consider it to be a motorcycle.
Links: www.dmv.org/ri-rhode-island/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
You don’t need a motorcycle license to drive a moped, but you do need a standard driver’s license, and you need to register it through the DMV. If your moped is gas powered, then you also need to get it inspected every two years.

When registering your moped, you’ll need to bring proof of insurance, proof of ownership (a Manufacturer’s Statement of Origin, Bill of Sale or an old registration), and a valid Rhode Island driver’s license. You’ll also need to fill out an Application for Registration and Title Certificate.

While riding, you just need to follow all of the standard traffic laws. Since your moped has a top speed of 30 MPH or less, don’t drive it on roads that have a minimum speed of higher than 30 MPH.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-rhode-island/

Insurance Laws
The Division of Motor Vehicles (DMV) insists that all motorcycle operators have a current motorcycle insurance policy before they operate their cycles. Motorcycle riding can lead to costly accidents, and the DMV must have some level of assurance that you're up to handling the financially responsibility. Ways to Establish Financial Responsibility

You can comply with the state's mandate with a policy that includes bodily insurance and property damage coverage that meets the state's minimum requirements. Two-Wheeled Vehicles Defined

Confused whether your cycle qualifies as a motorcycle under state law? Call the DMV at (401) 462-4368 for more information.

Or, read how the state defines the following vehicles:
- Motorized bicycle—A two-wheeled vehicle that can't reach speeds of over 30 MPH on a flat surface; it can be propelled by human power, motor power, or both.
- Motor Scooter—A motor-driven cycle with a cylinder capacity of less than 50 cc that can't reach speeds of over 30 MPH on a flat surface; it can only be propelled by motor power. The vehicle's motor must be no more than 4.9 hp.

If your two-wheeled vehicle exceeds these limits, the DMV will likely consider it to be a motorcycle.
Links: www.dmv.org/ri-rhode-island/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Rhode Island law requires motorcycle operators under 21 to wear a helmet. Additionally, all new operators, regardless of age, must wear a helmet for one year after the date that their motorcycle operator's license is issued.

All operators, regardless of age, must wear eye protection at all times. All motorcycle passengers must wear helmets.

Helmets and eye protection must be approved by Rhode Island's Administrator of the Division of Motor Vehicles. To make sure your equipment is approved, check with the Administrator before taking a motorcycle out on Rhode Island roadways.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#rhode-island

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South Carolina

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
The state of South Carolina defines mopeds as bikes that meet the following requirements:
- It may or may not have pedals, and has a motor that can propel the vehicle.
- The motor is no bigger than 50 CC (cubic centimeters), and produces 2 brake horsepower or less.
- It has a maximum speed of 30 MPH on a flat surface.
- It has an automatic transmission.


If your motorbike exceeds the above requirements, then it is considered to be a motorcycle and you must follow all of the motorcycle laws and regulations. Scooters

As far as the laws are concerned, South Carolina considers mopeds and scooters to be one and the same. Follow the same requirements outlined above for mopeds when determining if your scooter is considered a motorcycle or not.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-south-carolina/

50cc and over Law
150cc scooter laws South Carolina Scooters and motorcycles must have a vehicle license tag from the South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles. To operate a moped, you must have a class D, G, or M driver's license, while motorcycle and scooter drivers must have class M driver's licenses
Links: sc.edu/about/offices_and_divisions/law_enforcement_and_safety/index.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Scooters and motorcycles must have a vehicle license tag from the South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles.
Moped tags are issued by a moped dealer and must meet certain specifications.
- Moped tags must be made of reflective metal and have a validation sticker on the tag.

To operate a moped, you must have a class D, G, or M driver’s license, while motorcycle and scooter drivers must have class M driver’s licenses. Moped drivers are subject to traffic laws governing other motor vehicles. A moped driver must have his or her license in possession at all times when operating a moped.
Links: sc.edu/about/offices_and_divisions/law_enforcement_and_safety/index.php

Insurance Laws
In order to ensure that you are financially responsible for property damage or bodily injury after an accident you cause, you must have motorcycle liability insurance.

Your motorcycle insurance policy must include the following minimum coverage limits per accident:
- $25,000 for bodily injury, per person.
- $50,000 for total bodily injury if multiple people are hurt.
- $25,000 for property damage.
Links: www.dmv.org/sc-south-carolina/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
In South Carolina, all motorcycle operators and passengers under 21 must wear a helmet approved by the Department of Highways and Public Transportation. The helmet must be equipped with either a neck or chin strap, and it must be 'reflectorized' on both sides.

The Department is authorized to adopt and amend regulations covering helmet types and specifications and to establish and maintain a list of approved helmets. If you're subject to the helmet law, it's best to check with the Department on current regulations before riding on a motorcycle in South Carolina.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#south-carolina

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South Dakota

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In South Dakota, a moped is defined as a bike that:
- Has 2 or 3 wheels.
- Has an engine that is no bigger than 50 CC.
- Has an automatic transmission.

If your bike has an engine that is bigger than 50 CC, then it needs to be registered as a motorcycle. On the other hand, if your moped meets the above requirements then it does not need to be registered or titled.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-south-dakota/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Though mopeds and scooters look harmless, the South Dakota Motor Vehicles Division (MVD) does require registration for these motorized bikes. For clarity's sake, the MVD considers mopeds and scooters as one and the same.

Moped and Scooter Registration
Visit your county treasurer's office with:
- An Application for Motor Vehicle Title and Registration (Form MV-608).
- Proof of paying sales tax
- Either a manufacturer's statement of origin or a bill of sale
- Payment for $10 title fee
- Payment for any applicable registration fees.
Links: www.dmv.org/sd-south-dakota/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
South Dakota Motorcycle Insurance Requirements
To comply with South Dakota's motorcycle insurance laws you must have liability insurance to help pay for any property damage or bodily injuries suffered by others in an accident that you cause.

Your motorcycle insurance policy must include the following minimum coverage limits per accident:
- $25,000 for injury/death to one person.
- $50,000 for injury/death to 2 or more people.
- $25,000 for damage to property.
Links: www.dmv.org/sd-south-dakota/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
South Dakota law requires all motorcycle operators and passengers under 18 to wear a helmet that complies with federal regulations. In addition, operators of a motorcycle are required to wear eye protection unless their motorcycle has a windshield of sufficient height under the statutes. Also, riders in an enclosed cab do not need to wear a helmet or eye protection under South Dakota law.

No person is permitted to operate a motorcycle with a passenger under 18 unless the passenger is wearing a helmet.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#south-dakota

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Tennessee

50cc and Under Law
The State of Tennessee considers a motorized bicycle or moped to be a bike that:
- Has 2 or 3 wheels.
- Has an automatic transmission.
- Has a motor that is no bigger than 50 CC, and produces no more than 2 brake horsepower.
- Has a maximum speed of 30 MPH on level ground.

If your bike exceeds the above requirements, then it is likely considered to be a motorcycle rather than a moped, and you must follow all of the motorcycle laws and regulations in Tennessee.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-tennessee/

50cc and over Law
Two- and Three-Wheeled Vehicles Defined
If you're unsure about whether your vehicle requires registration and liability coverage, contact your local county clerk.

Motorcycle—In this state, a motorcycle is any vehicle with 2 or 3 wheels and with an engine the size of 125 cc or more. Motorcycles require registration and insurance. Motor-driven cycle—Also known as a scooter, a motor-driven cycle is a vehicle with 2 or 3 wheels and an engine of up to 125 CC. Motor-driven cycles require registration and insurance. Moped—In this state, a moped is any motor-driven cycle with an engine under 50 cc. Because these vehicles can only venture into certain areas, you don't have to register or insure them; however, the DOS strongly suggests both register and insuring your moped if you plan to operate it in one of the few allowable public areas.
Links: www.dmv.org/tn-tennessee/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Moped Laws
In order to ride a moped on public roads, you need to carry a valid Tennessee driver’s license. Note that a motorcycle endorsement is not required as long as your bike meets the moped requirements.

You must register and title mopeds through your local County Clerk’s office. You’ll need to bring a Manufacturer’s Statement of Origin or the previous title, and a valid form of identification.

You can’t drive mopeds on sidewalks or interstate highways, and you must always wear a proper helmet while riding.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-tennessee/

Insurance Laws
Even though you don't have to show proof of financial responsibility when you register your motorcycle or scooter, you must have an approved form of coverage, generally through motorcycle insurance, to legally operate either one on state roads.
Links: www.dmv.org/tn-tennessee/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Moped Laws
In order to ride a moped on public roads, you need to carry a valid Tennessee driver’s license. Note that a motorcycle endorsement is not required as long as your bike meets the moped requirements.

You must register and title mopeds through your local County Clerk’s office. You’ll need to bring a Manufacturer’s Statement of Origin or the previous title, and a valid form of identification.

You can’t drive mopeds on sidewalks or interstate highways, and you must always wear a proper helmet while riding.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-tennessee/

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Texas

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
There are some slight difference between the requirements for motorized bicycles or mopeds and motorcycles. Fortunately, Texas has published a certified moped list.

If you don’t see your moped on the list, you’ll need to determine the following:
- Does it have an automatic transmission?
- Is the engine smaller than 50 CC?
- Does it have a top speed of 30 MPH on level ground?


If the answer to all three of the above questions is “yes”, then it should be considered a moped and you can get a moped license (a “K” restriction.) If not, then it is a motorcycle and you must get a class M motorcycle license.

In order to get your moped license with the “K” restriction, you will need to do the following:

Bring your moped affidavit to a moped dealer for completion.
Then bring the completed affidavit to a tax office, along with valid ID and your permit/license.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-texas/

50cc and over Law
Texas statutes are very specific about the definition of a motorcycle and other similar vehicles:
- Motorcycle—A motorized vehicle with a saddle for the rider and operating on a maximum of three wheels. This does not include tractors. Motorcycles are considered the same as passenger vehicles when it comes to registration, titling, and insurance requirements.
- Moped—A motorized cycle that does not operate faster than 30 MPH and has less than 2 hp and less than 50 ccs displacement.
- Motor-driven cycle—A motorcycle with engine displacement of less than 250 cc. If you need further information about these definitions or regarding your specific vehicle, contact your local TxDOT office. You can also call Customer Service at (888) 368-4689.
Links: www.dmv.org/tx-texas/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
To register a moped or scooter, bring the following to your county tax office:
- Valid identification.
- Proof of insurance.
- Your title or Manufacturer’s Certificate of Origin.
- Payment for the registration fee.

Once registered, you should receive a motorcycle tag. You must affix the tag to the rear side of your moped or scooter.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-texas/

Insurance Laws
You are required to carry at least the minimum amount of insurance in order to ride your moped or scooter on public roads. You must also pass an annual vehicle inspection.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-texas/

Helmet Laws
Generally, Texas requires all riders and passengers to wear a helmet that meets the safety standard of the state's Department of Public Safety.

However, those 21 and over who successfully complete an approved motorcycle operator training and safety course or those covered by a health insurance plan providing at least $10,000 in medical benefits for injuries incurred while operating the motorcycle can drive the bike without wearing a helmet. A peace officer may not stop or detain a person who is the operator of, or a passenger on, a motorcycle for the sole purpose of determining whether the person has successfully completed the motorcycle operator training and safety course or is covered by a health insurance plan.

If you are subject to the mandatory helmet law, it's best to check with the Department of Public Safety to learn about current helmet safety standards before taking to the open road on a motorcycle.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#texas

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Utah

50cc and Under Law
If your vehicle has no more than 3 wheels, a motor with any size engine displacement, and no pedals and you want to drive it on public roads, you'll need a motorcycle license. This includes scooters (like Vespas). The type of motorcycle you'll be permitted to drive will depend upon the type of motorcycle you take your driving test on.
Links: www.dmv.org/ut-utah/other-types.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
You must title and register your two-wheeled, motor-driven vehicle, if you plan to take it out on public roads.
Links: www.dmv.org/ut-utah/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
If you drive—or ride—a motor vehicle on Utah roads, you are required to take financial responsibility for any damage or injury your vehicle causes. This is called liability. In Utah, all highway vehicles, including motorcycles, must be covered by a liability insurance policy.
Links: www.dmv.org/ut-utah/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Title 41. Motor Vehicles. Chapter 6. Traffic Rules and Regulations. Article 15. Miscellaneous Rules. Section 41-6-107.8. Motorcycle or Motor-driven Cycle -- Protective Headgear -- Closed Cab Excepted -- Specifications and Standards:
"(a) No person under the age of 18 shall operate or ride upon a motorcycle or motor-driven cycle upon a public highway unless such person is wearing protective headgear which complies with standards established by the commissioner of public safety.
Links: www.bikersrights.com/states/utah/utah.html

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Vermont

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In order for you to be able to register your motorized bicycle as a moped (or a motor-driven cycle), it must meet the following restrictions:
- It must have a top speed of 30 MPH on level ground.
- It must have an automatic transmission (no manual shifting of gears.)
- It must have an engine that has a displacement size no bigger than 50 CC (cubic centimeters.)
- It must have 2 or 3 wheels.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-vermont/

50cc and over Law
Motorcycle—A motor-driven vehicle that:
- Travels with no more than 3 wheels on the ground.
- Has a seat or a saddle for the rider
- Is not a moped, golf cart, track-driven vehicle, tractor or a vehicle that contains its operator and passengers inside an enclosed cab.
Links: www.dmv.org/vt-vermont/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
In order to register your bike as a moped, you will need to complete a Motor Vehicle Registration, Tax, and Title application (Form TA-VD-119).

Once completed, bring your application, a bill of sale and a valid ID to your local DMV office for processing. Additional Regulations

If your bike is a moped and not a motorcycle, then you do not need a class M driver’s license – just a standard class C driver’s license will do. You’ll also need to follow all of the standard traffic laws while riding on public roads.

Wearing a helmet is not required for mopeds or motorized bicycles, but it’s still a good idea to wear on
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-vermont/

Insurance Laws
To comply with Vermont's motorcycle insurance laws, you must have liability insurance for your bike.

Your motorcycle insurance policy must include the following minimum coverage limits:
- $25,000 for injury/death to any one person
- $50,000 for injuries/deaths for two or more people
- $10,000 for damages to property in any one accident
Links: www.dmv.org/vt-vermont/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Vermont law requires all motorcycle drivers and passengers to wear a helmet approved by the Commissioner of the Department of Motor Vehicles.

Although the Commissioner has the power to approve helmet types, the Vermont legislature did pass a law requiring all helmets to be equipped with either a neck to chin strap.

To make sure your helmet complies with the Commissioner's requirements, contact the Department of Motor Vehicles before riding on a motorcycle in Vermont.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#vermont

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Virginia

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In Virginia, mopeds are defined as vehicles that:
- Have no more than 3 wheels.
- Have a seat or saddle that is at least 24 inches high.
- Have a motor that displaces less than 50 CC.
- Have a top speed of 35 MPH on level ground.

If your bike exceeds the above specifications then it is considered a motorcycle, and you must follow all of the laws applicable to motorcycles.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-virginia/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Moped Requirements
To drive a moped on public roads, you are required to get it registered and titled through the Virginia DMV.

To register your moped, bring the following items to a customer service center:
- A completed copy of an Application for Certificate of Title and Registration (Form VSA 17A.)
- A Moped Certification (Form VSA 31.)
- Proof of ownership (a title, manufacturer’s certificate of origin or bill of sale.)
- Proof of your address (a valid ID).
- Payment for the $10 titling fee and $20.24 registration fee (via cash, check or credit card. Some counties have different fees.)

Once registered and titled, you should be issued a license plate by the DMV that you will need to affix to the back of your bike.

Fortunately, you are not required to have a driver’s license, carry insurance, get safety inspections, pay a use tax or any other fees.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-virginia/

Insurance Laws
Moped Requirements
To drive a moped on public roads, you are required to get it registered and titled through the Virginia DMV.

To register your moped, bring the following items to a customer service center:
- A completed copy of an Application for Certificate of Title and Registration (Form VSA 17A.)
- A Moped Certification (Form VSA 31.)
- Proof of ownership (a title, manufacturer’s certificate of origin or bill of sale.)
- Proof of your address (a valid ID).
- Payment for the $10 titling fee and $20.24 registration fee (via cash, check or credit card. Some counties have different fees.)

Once registered and titled, you should be issued a license plate by the DMV that you will need to affix to the back of your bike.

Fortunately, you are not required to have a driver’s license, carry insurance, get safety inspections, pay a use tax or any other fees.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-virginia/

Helmet Laws
Moped and Scooter Rules of the Road
While driving your motorized bike on public roads, there are a number of important rules to remember:
- You can’t exceed 35 MPH (if you can go over 35 MPH, your bike is considered a motorcycle.)
- You must be at least 16 years old.
- You must wear an appropriate helmet.
- You must wear safety goggles if you do not have a proper windshield.
- You must carry an appropriate photo ID (not a driver’s license.)
- You can’t drive on interstate highways.
- You can’t wear earphones.
- You must follow all of the other standard driving laws.

It’s also worth noting that even though you don’t need a driver’s license to ride a moped or scooter, you can’t drive if you’ve had your license suspended because of a DUI.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-virginia/

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Washington

50cc and Under Law
According to the state of Washington, a moped is classified as a motorized device that:
- Touches the ground with no more than 3 wheels at any time.
- CANNOT drive faster than 30 MPH on flat ground.
- Has an electric OR a liquid fuel motor of up to 50 cc.
- Cannot produce more than 2 brake horsepower
Links: www.dmv.org/wa-washington/other-types.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
In order to legally ride your moped in Washington, it must be registered, and you will need a valid driver’s license and license plate. You do NOT need to have your moped insured.
Links: www.dmv.org/wa-washington/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
While motorcycle liability insurance is not required in Washington, it’s still a good idea to look into covering yourself and others in case of an accident. This is especially true if you have a home or other assets to protect
Links: www.dmv.org/wa-washington/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
You (and your passengers) must wear a helmet approved by the U.S. Department of Transportation, as well as eye protection (unless you have a windshield).
Links: www.dmv.org/wa-washington/other-types.php

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West Virginia

50cc and Under Law
In West Virginia, motorized bicycles and mopeds are defined as motor-driven cycles that:
- Has 2 or 3 wheels.
- Has foot pedals to assist with propulsion.
- Has a motor that produces no more than 2 brake horsepower, and has a displacement no bigger than 50 CC.
- Has a maximum speed of 30 MPH on a level surface.
- Has an automatic drive system that does not require manual clutching or shifting.

If your bike exceeds the above specifications then it is considered a motorcycle, and you must follow all of the motorcycle laws and requirements.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-west-virginia/

50cc and over Law
The state recognizes the following as two-wheeled vehicles:
Motorcycle—The state considers any two-wheeled, motor-driven cycle with an engine of more than 50 cc to be a motorcycle. If you have a motorcycle, you must register it and cover it with liability insurance.

Scooter/Moped—Exact names for these two-wheeled vehicles vary, but if it has an engine of 50 cc or less the state recognizes it as a scooter or moped. Generally*, residents don’t have to register or insure these motor-driven cycles.
Links: www.dmv.org/wv-west-virginia/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
You must get your moped titled and registered through your local DMV Office if you want to drive on public roads. The process is very similar to registering and titling a regular passenger vehicle or motorcycle.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-west-virginia/

Insurance Laws
If you plan to operate your motorcycle on state roads, you must register it and purchase motorcycle insurance for it. Your policy must include liability insurance that meets the following minimum requirements:
- $25,000 for property damages
- $25,000 for one accident, one injury/death
- $50,000 for one accident, two injuries/deaths

Purchasing the minimum insurance requirements puts you in the clear with the state, but keep in mind you may want—or need—additional types of coverage to make sure you’ve fully protected your cycle and met the requirements of any lienholder you may have.
Links: www.dmv.org/wv-west-virginia/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
In West Virginia, all motorcycle operators and passengers must wear a helmet that is securely fastened to the head by either a neck or chin strap. The helmet must be designed to deflect blows and resist penetration and spread impact forces. The law requires helmets to meet current performance specifications established by federal law, the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard Z 90.1 or Snell Safety Standards (Snell) for Protective Headgear for Vehicle Users.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#west-virginia

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Wisconsin

50cc and Under Law
Mopeds
In Wisconsin, motorized bicycles or mopeds are classified as any bike that:
- Has a maximum speed of 30 MPH on a flat surface.
- Is powered by a motor that is no bigger than 50 CC if it has an automatic transmission.
- Is powered by a motor that is no bigger than 130 CC if it has bicycle pedals that can fully propel the vehicle with human power.

If your motorized bike exceeds the above specifications then it is a motorcycle, and you must follow all of the motorcycle laws.

Scooters
Motorized scooters are defined as vehicles that:
- Have 2 wheels.
- Have an electric or gasoline motor that is capable of fully propelling the vehicle.

Unlike mopeds and motorized bicycles, you aren’t required to register and title a scooter. However, they also can’t be driven on public roads.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-wisconsin/

50cc and over Law
Two-Wheeled Vehicles Defined
Trying to figure out if a cycle qualifies as a motorcycle under Wisconsin's complex laws can be confusing. You can always call WisDOT at (608) 266-2353, though, for help with this.

Here's a summary of some pertinent vehicle definitions:
- Type 1 Motorcycle—A motor vehicle that has a power source as an integral part of the vehicle, can travel over 30 MPH, has 2 wheels in tandem, and is built for one rider.
- Type 2 Motorcycle—A motor vehicle designed to have at least 3 wheels, such as a golf cart.
- Motorbike —A bicycle with a power unit added that can't reach speeds of 30 MPH.
- Moped —A vehicle that has a seat for the operator, a power source as an integral part of the vehicle, and can't travel at over 30 MPH.
Links: www.dmv.org/wi-wisconsin/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Mopeds
Mopeds are defined as vehicles that come with an engine that is 50 CC or less for automatic transmissions, or 130 CC or less if it has bike-style pedals.

Mopeds must be titled and registered, just like a car or motorcycle. Registrations expire biennially and cost $23.

You just need a regular driver's license to operate a moped, or you can get a special restricted license permitting you to only operate a moped. An instruction permit doesn't count.

Moped riders need to obey all the usual traffic laws. While mopeds may be driven on public roads (except where outlawed), don't drive them on freeways or sidewalks. You can take up a traffic lane as long as you're not blocking traffic. You can't have any passengers on your moped.

You're not required to wear a helmet or have your lights on during daylight, but the state (and your mother) recommends doing both.
Links: www.dmv.org/wi-wisconsin/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
Before you're allowed to take your cycle on the streets, you need to show that you meet the minimum financial responsibility requirements mandated by the Department of Transportation (WisDOT).
Links: www.dmv.org/wi-wisconsin/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
Wisconsin law requires all motorcycle operators under 18 or those operators holding an instructional permit to wear a helmet with a chin strap that is properly fastened. Passengers under 18 are also required to wear a helmet.

Regardless of age, all motorcycle operators must wear a protective face shield, glasses, or goggles, unless the bike is equipped with a windshield that rises to a minimum of 15 inches above the handlebars.

The laws do not apply to those participating in a parade sanctioned by a local municipality.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#wisconsin

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Wyoming

50cc and Under Law
The State of Wyoming is unique when it comes to motorized bicycles and mopeds – there are no state-wide regulations! Instead, the regulations and requirements vary between counties and cities.

So, unfortunately all we can do is recommend that you contact the Wyoming Department of Transportation for your local area to find out more.

Call your county treasurer regarding registering a moped or scooter, and hope for the best. This is the Wyoming Department of Transportation's (WYDOT) unsolved mystery: no hard answers, only guesses.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-wyoming/

50cc and over Law
The State of Wyoming is unique when it comes to motorized bicycles and mopeds – there are no state-wide regulations! Instead, the regulations and requirements vary between counties and cities.

So, unfortunately all we can do is recommend that you contact the Wyoming Department of Transportation for your local area to find out more.

Call your county treasurer regarding registering a moped or scooter, and hope for the best. This is the Wyoming Department of Transportation's (WYDOT) unsolved mystery: no hard answers, only guesses.
Links: www.motorizedbicyclehq.com/motorized-bicycle-laws-wyoming/

Registration Laws/ Licensing Laws
Call your county treasurer regarding registering a moped or scooter, and hope for the best. This is the Wyoming Department of Transportation's (WYDOT) unsolved mystery: no hard answers, only guesses.
Links: www.dmv.org/wy-wyoming/other-types.php

Insurance Laws
Motorcycle Insurance Minimum Requirements in Wyoming
Before you can ride a motorcycle on public roads in Wyoming, you have to prove you can pay for any damages or injuries you cause. This is called “financial responsibility.” This is especially important in this state, because the law requires that the at-fault party in an accident is responsible for all the damages in that accident. The best way to do this is by having motorcycle insurance
Links: www.dmv.org/wy-wyoming/insurance/motorcycle-insurance-minimum-requirements.php

Helmet Laws
In Wyoming, only those motorcycle drivers and passengers under 18 are required to wear helmets. Helmets must be securely fastened and comply with the standards established by the state's Superintendent of the Department of Transportation.

If you're under 18, it's best to check with the Department to make sure your helmet complies with current standards before riding on a motorcycle in Wyoming. Finally, there are two exceptions to this law.

If you're under 18 and ride in an enclosed cab, you are not required to wear a helmet. Also, motorcycle operators under 18 who are participating in an officially-authorized parade are exempted from the helmet law.
Links: www.edgarsnyder.com/motorcycle-accidents/state-helmet-laws/#wyoming

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